Posted in Economic Issues, Education, emotional intelligence, Free Society, Free-Market, Liberty, Philosophy, Policy Issues, Representative Republic vs. Democracy, Rule of Law, U.S. Constitution, Uncategorized

Audio Blog Episode 3: James Keena, author of 2084: American Apocalypse

 

Posted in American Presidents, Bailouts, big government, Dependency, Disease Prevention, Economic Issues, Government Regulations, Government Spending, Government Stimulus, Leadership, Organizational structure, outcomes measurement, Patient Safety, Policy Issues, Poverty, Prevention, Representative Republic vs. Democracy, Rule of Law, U.S. Constitution, Uncategorized, Unemployment

Coronavirus and Federalism | International Liberty

John Daniel Davidson of the Federalist echoes the benefits of having choices made at the state and local level.

The founders wisely chose a federal republic for our form of government, which means sovereignty is divided between states and the federal government. The powers of the federal government are limited and enumerated, while all powers not granted to the feds are reserved for the states, including emergency police powers of the kind we’re seeing states and localities use now. …Much of the media seems wholly unaware of this basic feature of our system of government. …Trump explained that many governors might have a more direct line on this equipment and if so they should go ahead and acquire it themselves, no need to wait on Washington, D.C. This is of course exactly the way federalism is supposed to work. …We should expect the government power that’s closest to affected communities to be the most active, while Washington, D.C., concern itself with larger problems.

Source: Coronavirus and Federalism | International Liberty

Posted in American Presidents, big government, Education, Free Society, Government Regulations, Liberty, Philosophy, Policy Issues, Representative Republic vs. Democracy, Rule of Law, U.S. Constitution, Uncategorized

Without Free Speech, All Speech Becomes Government Speech – Foundation for Economic Education

By Barry Brownstein

A new survey conducted in the United States by the Campaign for Free Speech found 51 percent of Americans agreed with this statement: “The First Amendment goes too far in allowing hate speech in modern America and should be updated to reflect the cultural norms of today.” 48 percent thought, and a majority of millennials agreed, “hate speech” should be outlawed. An astonishing 54 percent of millennials thought jail time should be the consequence penalty for hate speech. Hate speech was not defined in the survey.

In a future democratic socialist administration mired in economic collapse, is it a stretch to predict that protection of free speech will continue to wane making criticism of government policies verboten?

If disagreement over the number of genders can’t be tolerated, surely disagreements on a debt jubilee or a wealth tax wouldn’t be tolerated either.

https://fee.org/articles/without-free-speech-all-speech-becomes-government-speech/

Posted in Consumption Inequality, Cost of labor, Dependency, Economic Issues, Education, Free Society, Liberty, Organizational structure, outcomes, Philosophy, Policy Issues, Poverty, Representative Republic vs. Democracy, Rule of Law, Uncategorized, Wealth

Why the Pilgrims Abandoned Common Ownership for Private Property – Foundation for Economic Education

Governor Bradford recorded in his diary that everybody was happy to claim their equal share of production, but production only shrank. Slackers showed up late for work in the fields, and the hard workers resented it. It’s called “human nature.”

The disincentives of the socialist scheme bred impoverishment and conflict until, facing starvation and extinction, Bradford altered the system. He divided common property into private plots, and the new owners could produce what they wanted and then keep or trade it freely.

Communal socialist failure was transformed into private property/capitalist success, something that’s happened so often historically it’s almost monotonous. The “people over profits” mentality produced fewer people until profit—earned as a result of one’s care for his own property and his desire for improvement—saved the people.

https://fee.org/articles/why-the-pilgrims-abandoned-common-ownership-for-private-property/

Posted in American Presidents, Economic Issues, Free Society, Liberty, Philosophy, Policy Issues, Representative Republic vs. Democracy, Rule of Law, third-party payments

17 Facts on the Reunification of Germany – Foundation for Economic Education

“For decades, German families had been separated from one another between East Germany and West Germany. Post-World War II, the East German government—the German Democratic Republic (GDR)—constructed this physical barrier to define their territory separately from the government of West Germany, the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). The main distinguishing characteristic between the two governments? A generalized sense of freedom and liberty versus socialism and oppression.

The Berlin Wall served the GDR’s main purpose: “to permanently close off access to the West.” Between 1949 and 1961, West Germany provided East Germans with a pathway toward democracy and capitalism.”

https://fee.org/articles/17-facts-on-the-reunification-of-germany/

Posted in Dependency, Economic Issues, Free Society, Government Regulations, Income Inequality, Liberty, Philosophy, Policy Issues, Poverty, Progressivism, Representative Republic vs. Democracy, Tax Policy, Uncategorized, Wealth

Watch “What’s Right About Social Justice – Learn Liberty” on YouTube

If the concept of social justice simply means justice for the individuals who make up society, then it appears the utopian socialist-progressives and the libertarian free-marketeers may have some goals in common.

However, when it comes to the ways & means to achieve those goals, the ideological divide is still wide.

So maybe rhetoric on both side should always start with…

“what is the most effective strategies or economic policies to allow people to optimize opportunity and escape poverty.”

Posted in Economic Issues, Foreign policy, Free Society, Free-Market, Liberty, Nation-Building, Philosophy, Policy Issues, Progressivism, Representative Republic vs. Democracy, Rule of Law, Uncategorized, Unemployment

England & Europe: Never Fully Integrated | National Review

A detour into the political history of England with Victor Davis Hanson.

Historically, Britain has looked more upon the seas and the New World than eastward to Europe. In that transatlantic sense, a Canadian or American typically had more in common with an Englander than did a German or Greek.

Over the last 30 years, the British nearly forgot that fact as they merged into the European Union and pledged to adopt European values in a shared trajectory to supposed utopia.

To the degree that England remained somewhat suspicious of EU continentalism by rejecting the euro and not embracing European socialism, the country thrived. But when Britain followed the German example of open borders, reversed the market reforms of Margaret Thatcher, and adopted the pacifism and energy fantasies of the EU, it stagnated.

https://www.nationalreview.com/2019/09/england-europe-never-fully-integrated/

Posted in American Exceptionalism, American Independence, big government, Free Society, Government Regulations, Influence peddling, Liberty, Neo-conservatism, Philosophy, Policy Issues, Progressivism, Representative Republic vs. Democracy, Rule of Law, Uncategorized

Old Wisdom, Modern Folly | Frontpage Mag

Welcome to another edition of Friday’s Philosophical Foray beyond Healthcare!  Bruce Thornton examines the writings of Alexis de Tocqueville to illuminate “The wages of modernity’s technocratic hubris.”

“When it comes to America’s political order, no commentator today has yet come close to the brilliance of Alexis de Tocqueville, who was astonishingly prescient in pointing out the dangers inherent in the democracy he so admired.

“the ablest men . . . are rarely placed at the head of affairs.” With the citizens’ attention focused on their private affairs and necessity to make a living, “it is difficult for [them] to discern the best means of attaining the end,” which is “the welfare of the country.” Hence the voters’ “conclusions are hastily formed from a superficial inspection of the more prominent features of a question.” As a result, “mountebanks of all sorts are able to please the people, while their truest friends frequently fail to gain their confidence.”

This description obviously rings true today, in our age of the “low-information voter” and the multiple information platforms that promote the “superficial inspection” of sound-bite reporting that highlights only the politicized and emotionally charged “prominent features” of any issue.

“The people, surrounded by flatterers, find great difficulty in surmounting their inclinations; whenever they are required to undergo privation or any inconvenience, even to attain an end sanctioned by their own rational calculation, they almost always refuse at first to comply.”

And they are egged on by special interest groups like AARP that lobby politicians (“flatterers”), especially Democrats, who always champion expanding redistributionist programs rather than reforming them. Here, too, Tocqueville was prophetic:

“The power of the majority is so absolute and irresistible that one must give up one’s rights as a citizen and almost abjure one’s qualities as a man if one intends to stray from the track which it prescribes.”

That description fits Congress no matter which party is in control, and explains why nothing is being done to address this threat to our economic well-being.”

Source: Old Wisdom, Modern Folly | Frontpage Mag