Posted in American Exceptionalism, American Independence, American Presidents, Education, Free Society, Leadership, Liberty, Nation-Building, Philosophy, Policy Issues, Progressivism, Representative Republic vs. Democracy, Rule of Law, U.S. Constitution, U.S. Security, Uncategorized

Watch “The Candace Owens Show: Zuhdi Jasser” on YouTube

Dr. Zuhdi Jasser, a devout Muslim, speaks to Candace Owens about the dangers of political/theocratic Islam and its incompatibility with the Constitutional Representative Republic form of government in the USA. He discusses the ideological roots of theocratic Islam and it’s alliance with social collectivism and separtist/fascist movements of the 20th Century. He contends that disruption, by speaking truth to power, within the Muslim communities will be the only force effective enough to bring about reforms compatible with western democracy.

Posted in American Exceptionalism, American Independence, American Presidents, big government, Free Society, Liberty, Neo-conservatism, Philosophy, Progressivism, Quotes from American Presidents, Representative Republic vs. Democracy, Rule of Law, U.S. Constitution, Uncategorized

How to Choose a True Leader in the 2020 Election | Intellectual Takeout | Larry Brownstein

Larry Brownstein

While Joe Biden and Kamala Harris go on and on about leadership we should look back to leadership lessons from Thomas Jefferson’s first inaugural address.

Harris says she wants a mandate, yet Jefferson understood the country was a republic, not a democracy.  In the Constitution, there are no provisions for claiming a governing mandate; claiming to have a mandate based on a majority vote, Jefferson would say violates a “sacred principle” and makes you an oppressive tyrant:

“Though the will of the majority is in all cases to prevail, that will to be rightful must be reasonable; that the minority possess their equal rights, which equal law must protect, and to violate would be oppression.”

Many have pointed out that today’s progressives behave like “Medieval Inquisitors.” Jefferson pointed to political intolerance as “despotic” and as “wicked” as religious intolerance:

Let us restore to social intercourse that harmony and affection without which liberty and even life itself are but dreary things. And let us reflect that, having banished from our land that religious intolerance under which mankind so long bled and suffered, we have yet gained little if we countenance a political intolerance as despotic, as wicked, and capable of as bitter and bloody persecutions.

So, what should government do? Jefferson was clear:

A wise and frugal Government, which shall restrain men from injuring one another, shall leave them otherwise free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned. This is the sum of good government, and this is necessary to close the circle of our felicities.

In his address, Jefferson didn’t promise a single new program, but he explored the principles by which he would lead:

Equal and exact justice to all men, of whatever state or persuasion, religious or political; peace, commerce, and honest friendship with all nations, entangling alliances with none; the support of the State governments in all their rights, as the most competent administrations for our domestic concerns and the surest bulwarks against anti-republican tendencies…

Source: How to Choose a True Leader in the 2020 Election

Posted in Disease Prevention, Economic Issues, Free Society, Free-Market, Government Regulations, Job loss, Liberty, Philosophy, Policy Issues, Poverty, Rule of Law, U.S. Security, Uncategorized, Unemployment, Wealth

Four Months of Unprecedented Government Malfeasance – Imprimis

The coronavirus lockdowns demonstrated our leaders’ ignorance of economic interdependence. After the riots, that ignorance has been shown to run far deeper. It is an ignorance about government’s most fundamental obligation: to safeguard life, liberty, and property. It is an ignorance about human nature and human striving.

https://imprimis.hillsdale.edu/four-months-unprecedented-government-malfeasance/

Posted in Education, Free Society, Government Regulations, Liberty, Philosophy, Policy Issues, Progressivism, Rule of Law, Uncategorized

Why George Orwell’s Quote on ‘Self-Censorship’ Is More Relevant Than Ever – Foundation for Economic Education

Welcome to Friday’s Philosophical Foray beyond Healthcare!

Government bureaus are not needed for mass censorship. You only need people in authority willing to acquiesce to the intimidation tactics of an idea-censoring, anti-free speech mob wielding their social & professional weaponry like pitchforks.

Rule One: Speak your mind at your own peril. Rule Two: Never risk commissioning a story that goes against the narrative. Rule Three: Never believe an editor or publisher who urges you to go against the grain. Eventually, the publisher will cave to the mob, the editor will get fired or reassigned, and you’ll be hung out to dry.

“The above is a quotation from George Orwell’s preface to Animal Farm, titled “The Freedom of the Press,” where he discussed the chilling effect the Soviet Union’s influence had on global publishing and debate far beyond the reach of its official censorship laws.

Wait, no it isn’t. The quote is actually an excerpt from the resignation letter of New York Times opinion editor and writer Bari Weiss, penned this week, where she blows the whistle on the hostility toward intellectual diversity that now reigns supreme at the country’s most prominent newspaper.”

https://fee.org/articles/why-george-orwells-warning-on-self-censorship-is-more-relevant-than-ever/

Posted in American Independence, big government, Dependency, Economic Issues, Free Society, Leadership, Liberty, Philosophy, Policy Issues, Progressivism, Rule of Law, U.S. Security, Uncategorized

Watch “KGB defector Yuri Bezmenov’s warning to America (1984)” on YouTube

We must learn history. The examples Mr. Bezmenov gave in 1984 need to be studied and taken seriously; as do the 4-steps of ideological subversion. We see it playing out in our city streets today.

  • Demoralization
  • Destabilization
  • Crisis
  • Normalization
Posted in Economic Issues, Education, emotional intelligence, Free Society, Free-Market, Liberty, Philosophy, Policy Issues, Representative Republic vs. Democracy, Rule of Law, U.S. Constitution, Uncategorized

Audio Blog Episode 3: James Keena, author of 2084: American Apocalypse

 

Posted in Economic Issues, Education, emotional intelligence, Liberty, Philosophy, Policy Issues, Rule of Law, Uncategorized

The Era of Moral Thuggery | Law & Liberty | Theodore Dalrymple

George-Floyd-Protest-1536x768

As a strange illustration of one of the three supposed laws of dialectical materialism—the interpenetration of opposites—racists and modern anti-racists are united by the importance they ascribe to race, though they are divided by their explanation of why race should be so important. The racists believe that it’s because of biology and the anti-racists believe it’s because of socially-sanctioned racism.

They are united too in their totalitarian (or at least bullying) tendencies, though in this respect the modern anti-racists are now more dangerous, not because they are worse people than the racists, but because racism as a doctrine is mostly, if not entirely, discredited. Racism is truly opposed not by anti-racists, but by non-racists, that is, people who do not judge or behave towards others according to their race.

…As under the totalitarians, positive and public assent to and enthusiasm for certain propositions are required. Failure in this regard is a symptom or sign of being an enemy of the people.

The demonstrations in London (and elsewhere) are illustrative of two contemporary cultural traits. The first is the importance ascribed to opinion as an exclusive, or at least large, component of virtue; the second is the vehemence of expression as the marker of sincerity.

…Actual good conduct, which requires some effort, restraint, and even self-sacrifice, has correspondingly become less important in earning a reputation for goodness. Holding a placard, chanting a slogan, expressing an opinion, is enough.

In short, the more you feel, as measured by the vehemence with which you express it, the better person you are, and the safer from criticism.

It seems, then, that we have entered an era of what might be called moral thuggery. It is, as ever, important not to exaggerate: we do not live in the worst of times, we do not fear the midnight knock on the door if we express a heterodox idea. But there are substantial numbers of people who, in the name of their own moral outrage and sense of righteousness, would like to impose, or at least would not object to the imposition of, a regime in which people did fear that midnight knock. We cannot assume that everyone yearns to let others breathe free.

 

The Era of Moral Thuggery