Posted in Access to healthcare, CDC, Disease Prevention, Education, Evidence-based Medicine, FDA, News From Washington, outcomes, outcomes measurement, Patient Choice, Patient Safety, Uncategorized, Unsettled Science

FDA to Study Hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19 | MedPage Today

The drug is currently approved for malaria and also for rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, which is its main use in the U.S. It’s therefore available to be prescribed off-label, and some clinicians have already said they’re using it on COVID-19 patients. But neither Hahn nor other task force members addressed whether enough hydroxychloroquine is on hand to treat large numbers of coronavirus cases. Convalescent plasma is another treatment the FDA is considering for COVID-19, said FDA Commissioner Stephen Hahn, MD.

Convalescent plasma and the immune globulin that it contains is another possible treatment the agency is considering, Hahn added. “FDA’s been working for some time on this,” he said. “If you’ve been exposed to coronavirus and you’re better — you don’t have the virus in your blood — we could collect the blood, concentrate that and have the ability, once it’s pathogen-free, to give that to other patients, and the immune response could potentially provide a benefit to patients. That’s another thing we’re looking at; over the next couple of weeks, we’ll have information and we’re really pushing hard to try to accelerate that.” Such treatments have been effective in Ebola, for example.

Source: FDA to Study Hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19 | MedPage Today

Posted in Disease Prevention, Nutrition, outcomes, outcomes measurement, Prevention, Uncategorized, Unsettled Science

Filter Coffee Tied to Lower Diabetes Risk in Metabolomics Study

Adults who drank two to three cups of filtered coffee a day (the highest quartile of filtered coffee–metabolite score) had a 58% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes within 10 years than those who drank fewer than one cup of filtered coffee a day (lowest quartile) after adjusting for multiple confounders (odds ratio, 0.42; 95% confidence interval, 0.23 – 0.75).

The protective effect of drinking this high amount on the risk of developing type 2 diabetes was not seen with boiled coffee.

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/923238

Posted in Disease Prevention, Education, emotional intelligence, outcomes measurement, Philosophy, Stress, Uncategorized

Watch “What makes a good life? Lessons from the longest study on happiness | Robert Waldinger” on YouTube

The empericist in me celebrates the conclusions.

The intuitive part of me bears witness that we already knew this; either innately or by the collective awareness of unambiguous testimony throughout centuries of recorded history.

Things to ponder:

Why did this TED talk resemble a funeral eulogy of a life well lived, or life lessons backed up by scripture so often repeated by the pastor on Sunday mornings?

Because it’s true!

And it’s true regardless of how we know it; whether it be within the spark of creation or the instantaneous awareness of collective knowledge.

Now, will we act as if we believe the truth we acknowledge?

Posted in Disease Prevention, Education, Nutrition, outcomes, outcomes measurement, Patient Safety, Philosophy, Policy Issues, Prevention, Uncategorized

Flawed studies II. Occam’s Razor and How to Reduce Fructose Consumption. | Richard David Feinman

The principle known as Occam’s Razor (Named for William of Ockham (c. 1285–1349) is usually understood as a statement that a simple explanation is preferable to one that is more complicated. The principle has many variations. It might be interpreted as saying that you have to have a sense of priorities.

the idea can be described mathematically by saying that if the outcome, Y, of an experiment can be expressed with a rough sort of equation: Y = A + B + C +… and if A explains Y, then you don’t want to drag in B, C, etc unless you absolutely have to.
The bottom line on this post is that for obesity, diabetes and general health, the predominant effect of diet, the major contribution to the outcome — A in the equation above — is provided by substituting fat (any fat) for carbohydrate (any carbohydrate). That’s what the science says. That will give you the best effect. The B contribution (type of fat, type of carbohydrate) is strictly secondary. The practical consequence: if for some reason, you want to reduce fructose in the diet, the best advice is to reduce carbohydrate across the board.

https://feinmantheother.com/2012/07/27/flawed-studies-ii-occams-razor-and-how-to-reduce-fructose-consumption/

Posted in American Presidents, Disease Prevention, Education, FDA, government incompetence, Government Regulations, Nutrition, outcomes, Patient Choice, Patient Safety, Policy Issues, Prevention, Quality, Uncategorized

Watch “How the Government Made You Fat” on YouTube

Or AKA…

Stay in Your Lane:  Why the government should not parent the citizenry.

Posted in British National Health Service, Disease Prevention, Doctor-Patient Relations, Education, Evidence-based Medicine, Medical conditions and illness, outcomes, outcomes measurement, Patient Compliance, Patient Safety, Patient-centered Care, Prevention, Protocols, Quality, Uncategorized, Unsettled Science

Watch “Evidence Based Medicine Has Been Hijacked by Dr Aseem Malhotra | PHC Conference 2019” on YouTube

Insightful and fascinating glimpse into how medical science has been, and continues to be, distorted by special interests and ideological cabals to the detriment of patients.

Posted in Disease Prevention, Education, Evidence-based Medicine, outcomes, outcomes measurement, Patient Choice, Patient Safety, Patient-centered Care, Prevention, Protocols, Quality, Uncategorized

Dietary carbohydrate restriction as the first approach in diabetes management: Critical review and evidence base – ScienceDirect

The benefits of carbohydrate restriction in diabetes are immediate and well documented. Concerns about the efficacy and safety are long term and conjectural rather than data driven.

Dietary carbohydrate restriction reliably reduces high blood glucose, does not require weight loss (although is still best for weight loss), and leads to the reduction or elimination of medication. It has never shown side effects comparable with those seen in many drugs.

Here we present 12 points of evidence supporting the use of low-carbohydrate diets as the first approach to treating type 2 diabetes and as the most effective adjunct to pharmacology in type 1. They represent the best-documented, least controversial results. The insistence on long-term randomized controlled trials as the only kind of data that will be accepted is without precedent in science.

The seriousness of diabetes requires that we evaluate all of the evidence that is available. The 12 points are sufficiently compelling that we feel that the burden of proof rests with those who are opposed.”

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0899900714003323