Posted in Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), Consumer-Driven Health Care, Direct-Pay Medicine, Doctor-Patient Relationship, Evidence-based Medicine, Government Regulations, Independent Physicians, Medical Costs, Medicare, News From Washington, DC & Related Shenanigans, Patient Choice, Patient-centered Care, Price Tansparency, Quality, Reforming Medicare, Third-Party Free Practices, Uncategorized

The Road to Serfdom is Paved with Good Intentions – By Marilyn Singleton, MD, JD

The Road to Serfdom is Paved with Good Intentions
by Marilyn Singleton, MD, JD

Physicians are regulated and disciplined by the medical boards of the states in which they practice. Nonetheless, the federal government wants to track physicians with their own Medicare GPS. Whether enrolled or opted out, the government’s mission is accomplished: controlling physicians through layer upon layer of paperwork.

The effort to control physicians and patients’ choices one rule at a time is backfiring. Patients are seeking out “high value” physicians who are willing to be innovative in providing individualized care and affordable payment options. They know that real “administrative simplification” is bypassing the middlemen with an open market that has transparent costs.

via The Road to Serfdom is Paved with Good Intentions.

Posted in Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), Consumer-Driven Health Care, Direct-Pay Medicine, Doctor-Patient Relationship, Economic Issues, Education, Health Insurance, Medical Costs, Medicare, Patient Choice, Price Tansparency, Quality, Uncategorized

The Sorry State of Health Economics | John Goodman’s Health Policy Blog | NCPA.org

…there are no real prices in the conventional health care system. There are only artificial “reimbursement rates,” negotiated or imposed by third party payers. A considerable part of the book (Priceless, by John C. Goodman) is devoted to explaining how this creates perverse incentives for all parties and when people act on those incentives they do things that make costs higher, quality lower and access to care more difficult than otherwise would have been the case.

How does a standard health economics textbook handle this issue? To find out, I consulted Health Economics: Theory, Insights and Industry Studies, by Rexford Santerre and Stephen Neun. I am told that this textbook is pretty run of the mill as far as health economics goes. Here is what it does: It tries to force health care into the traditional toolbox of economic analysis. It starts by analyzing demand, then goes to supply and then tries to put the two together. Initially, it shows price determined by the intersection of a supply curve and a demand curve — just what would happen in the market for wheat or corn. It then explains variations on market structure, including monopoly, monopsony, etc. All straight from conventional price theory and all totally irrelevant for what happens in most health care markets.

… So you would think that if economists were going to try to force the economists’ box of tools on health care, there ought to be a few examples of where that actually works.

Take cosmetic surgery, for example. I go to the index…Search under “c”…That’s “c…o…s…” hmm…It’s not there.

Okay, what about Lasik surgery? I go under “L”…That’s “L…a…s…” hmm…No Lasik.

Now I’m on a roll. What about walk-in clinics? No. Free standing emergency rooms? Nix. Domestic medical tourism? Nein. International medical tourism? Nada. Online mail house pharmacies? Zilch. Concierge medicine? No way. Reference pricing for joint replacements in California? Not a word.

In 552 pages ― crammed with type so small my dwindling eyesight can barely see the words ― these guys have not one example of a health care market where conventional tools of economics might actually apply.

via The Sorry State of Health Economics | John Goodman’s Health Policy Blog | NCPA.org.

Posted in Direct-Pay Medicine, Doctor-Patient Relationship, Free Society, Government Spending, Health Insurance, Independent Physicians, Liberty, Medicaid Expansion, News From Washington, DC & Related Shenanigans, Patient Choice, Price Tansparency, Representative Republic vs. Democracy, Rule of Law, Third-Party Free Practices, U.S. Constitution, Uncategorized, Wealth

G. Keith Smith, M.D. – Exploring Defiance – Exploring Defiance

G. Keith Smith, M.D. – Exploring Defiance – Exploring Defiance.

 

Public judging of a law (Obamacare is just one example) as a failure invariably leads thoughtful people to dig deeper, wondering, for example if other laws have escaped the public scrutiny they deserved, and introduces an element of doubt about the sincerity of the players in the regime and even the legitimacy of the regime itself.  Having lost their health insurance as a result of Obamacare, a hitherto Obamacare supporter might entertain the unthinkable:  ”If I was lied to about being able to keep this policy I liked, what else have they lied to me about?”  Most people in this spot initially direct their frustration at individuals rather than focus on the system itself, mistakenly believing that a different political course of action is all that is needed.

Much more important is the non-political form of defiance, for this represents the “lack of consent of the governed,” that brand of defiance that even the cruelest of tyrants have found difficult to crush.  Ignoring, ridiculing or laughing at the awkward cruelty and corruption of tyrants and their cronies have historically been more effective in deterring political bullies than even the best results of “mid-term” elections, in my opinion.

Read entire article here

Posted in Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), Direct-Pay Medicine, Direct-Pay Practice Models, Doctor-Patient Relations, Doctor-Patient Relationship, Employee Benefits, Health Savings Accounts (HSA's), Independent Physicians, Medical Costs, News From Washington, DC & Related Shenanigans, Patient Choice, Patient-centered Care, Price Tansparency

POLICY: DPC Debated on Capitol Hill | DIRECT primary CARE JOURNAL

POLICY: DPC Debated on Capitol Hill | DIRECT primary CARE JOURNAL.

Posted in Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), Direct-Pay Medicine, Direct-Pay Practice Models, Doctor-Patient Relations, Doctor-Patient Relationship, Economic Issues, Free Society, Government Spending, Independent Physicians, Liberty, Medical Costs, Medicare, News From Washington, DC & Related Shenanigans, Patient Choice, Patient-centered Care, Price Tansparency, Quality, Tax Policy, Third-Party Free Practices, U.S. Constitution, Uncategorized

Youth Say ‘No Thanks’ to ACA’s Ponzicare

Youth Say ‘No Thanks’ to ACA’s PonzicareYouth Say ‘No Thanks’ to ACA’s Ponzicare.

By: G. Keith Smith, M.D. – http://SurgeryCenterOK.com

Posted in Consumer-Driven Health Care, Direct-Pay Medicine, Direct-Pay Practice Models, Doctor-Patient Relations, Doctor-Patient Relationship, Independent Physicians, Medical Costs, Patient Choice, Patient-centered Care, Price Tansparency, Third-Party Free Practices, Uncategorized

LAMBERTS, MD: ‘A year into direct pay: It doesn’t suck to be a doctor anymore.’ « Concierge Medicine Today

rob lamberts

LAMBERTS, MD: ‘A year into direct pay: It doesn’t suck to be a doctor anymore.’ « Concierge Medicine Today.

Posted in Consumer-Driven Health Care, Direct-Pay Medicine, Direct-Pay Practice Models, Doctor-Patient Relations, Doctor-Patient Relationship, Independent Physicians, Medical Costs, Patient Choice, Patient-centered Care, Price Tansparency, Quality, Uncategorized

A primary care direct pay model that works

A primary care direct pay model that works.

Posted in Consumer-Driven Health Care, Deductibles, Direct-Pay Medicine, Direct-Pay Practice Models, Doctor-Patient Relations, Doctor-Patient Relationship, Economic Issues, Employee Benefits, Free Society, Health Savings Accounts (HSA's), Independent Physicians, Liberty, Medical Costs, Patient Choice, Patient-centered Care, Price Tansparency, Quality, Uncategorized, Wait times to see a doctor

Free-Markets and Price Transparency Work in Health Care Just Like Other Industries