Posted in Access to healthcare, advance-pricing, Consumer-Driven Health Care, Direct-Pay Medicine, Direct-Pay Practice Models, Doctor-Patient Relationship, Economic Issues, Health Insurance, Healthcare financing, Independent Physicians, Medical Costs, Medical Practice Models, out-of-pocket costs, Patient Choice, Patient Compliance, Patient Safety, Patient-centered Care, Policy Issues, primary care, The Quadruple Aim, Third-Party Free Practices, Uncategorized, Wait times to see a doctor

More Patients Turning to ‘Direct Primary Care’ | Medscape

Christine Lehmann, MA

February 11, 2020

Having quick access to a primary care doctor 24/7 is very appealing to Mick Lowderman, 56, who is married with two children, ages 10 and 8. He pays a monthly membership fee to AtlasMD, a direct primary care practice in Wichita, KS.

Primary care is built on the long-term relationship between clinicians and patients. A 10- to 15-minute patient visit doesn’t support that relationship, Sullivan says.

When Kevin Boyd, 64, fell on his stairs in Wichita and broke three ribs, he didn’t go the emergency room. Instead, he called Umbehr, who told him to come to his office. He referred Boyd nearby for an X-ray and dispensed pain medications at his office. The total cost was $70.

In contrast, the first time Boyd fell and broke his ribs, he had Blue Cross Blue Shield and drove himself to the ER, where he saw the ER doctor, a radiologist for an MRI, and got shots for his pain. The total bill was $14,000, and he paid $2,600.

“I don’t put off care the way I used to because of the money I save,” says Boyd, who joined AtlasMD in 2015.
For his monthly membership fee of $75, Boyd gets several benefits, including unlimited 24/7 access to Umbehr by text, email, or phone, extended same- or next-day office visits, and free diagnostic tests and office procedures, such as EKGs, DEXA scans, and body fat analysis. If Boyd gets really sick and needs a house call, or if he needs a phone consult when traveling, those are also included in the fee.
Posted in British National Health Service, Disease Prevention, Doctor-Patient Relations, Education, Evidence-based Medicine, Medical conditions and illness, outcomes, outcomes measurement, Patient Compliance, Patient Safety, Patient-centered Care, Prevention, Protocols, Quality, Uncategorized, Unsettled Science

Watch “Evidence Based Medicine Has Been Hijacked by Dr Aseem Malhotra | PHC Conference 2019” on YouTube

Insightful and fascinating glimpse into how medical science has been, and continues to be, distorted by special interests and ideological cabals to the detriment of patients.

Posted in Access to healthcare, advance-pricing, Consumer-Driven Health Care, Direct-Pay Medicine, Direct-Pay Practice Models, Economic Issues, Health Insurance, Healthcare financing, Medical Costs, Medical Practice Models, out-of-pocket costs, Patient Choice, Patient Compliance, Patient-centered Care, Price Tansparency, Third-Party Free Practices, Uncategorized, Uninsured

Kroger and GoodRx Launch the Kroger Rx Savings Club to Redefine the Customer Experience

The market is rising up in response to the price-distortions of the medical-industrial complex. The Kroger-GoodRx partnership is a huge end-run around the price-skimming cabal of PBMs and their Health Plan co-conspirators.  – Robert Nelson, FfHCF

“More than 200 million prescriptions are left at pharmacy counters every year because people cannot afford to purchase them. The Kroger Rx Savings Club combines the power of Kroger’s nationwide network with GoodRx’s pricing technology to create a customer-first program that addresses the high cost of prescription drugs.”

Your Kroger Rx Savings Club membership includes:

  • Over 100 value priced generic medications specially priced at:
    • $3 (30-day) and $6 (90-day)
    • $6 (30-day) and $12 (90-day)
  • Select FREE medications
  • Exclusive Club prices on thousands of brand-name and generic medications
  • Coverage for up to 6 members (with a Family Membership)

Source: Kroger and GoodRx Launch the Kroger Rx Savings Club to Redefine the Customer Experience

Posted in Access to healthcare, Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), British National Health Service, Consumer-Driven Health Care, Deductibles, Direct-Pay Medicine, Direct-Pay Practice Models, Doctor-Patient Relationship, Economic Issues, Education, Electronic Health Records, Employee Benefits, Employer-Sponsored Health Plans, Government Regulations, Health Insurance, Health Savings Accounts (HSA's), Healthcare financing, Individual Market, Medicaid, medical inflation, Medical Practice Models, Medicare, Organizational structure, out-of-pocket costs, outcomes, Patient Choice, Patient Compliance, Patient Safety, Patient-centered Care, Policy Issues, Prevention, primary care, Quality, Reforming Medicaid, Reforming Medicare, The Quadruple Aim, The Triple Aim, Uncategorized

David Goldhill on Cost Drivers and Price Distortions in Healthcare

Minus the introduction and Q&A, the 45 -50 minute presentation is well worth your time. Engaging delivery and compelling case to consider… the cost drivers and distortions come from HOW we access and bill, as opposed to WHAT services are actually exchanged or provided. The key to understanding healthcare costs and pricing is to acknowledge that the answer is contained within our insurance card…and the processes it dictates and the tax/regulatory environment that it operates in. It is kind of like hiding something right out in the open; we look for clues everywhere except for what’s right in front of us. We tend to point fingers at easily identifiable components but fail to see what links them.

Posted in Economic Issues, Government Regulations, Healthcare financing, Independent Physicians, Medical Costs, medical inflation, Medical Practice Models, Medicare, Organizational structure, outcomes, outcomes measurement, Patient Choice, Patient Compliance, Patient Safety, Policy Issues, Prevention, Price Tansparency, primary care, Protocols, Quality, The Triple Aim, Uncategorized

The Problem With ‘Pay for Performance’ in Medicine – The New York Times

The idea is intuitively appealing: Reward doctors for positive outcomes, not per procedure. But it doesn’t seem to work as well as hoped.

Source: The Problem With ‘Pay for Performance’ in Medicine – The New York Times

Posted in Access to healthcare, Doctor-Patient Relations, Doctor-Patient Relationship, Organizational structure, Patient Choice, Patient Compliance, Patient-centered Care, Prevention, Uncategorized

Words I’m Not Using Until Further Notice | Robert Nelson, MD | LinkedIn

They all have it.  Every industry seems to have a list of obligatory phrases, two or more of which must be used in any meeting or memo in order to sound professional and lend a sense of credibility to

Source: Words I’m Not Using Until Further Notice | Robert Nelson, MD | LinkedIn

Posted in Disease Prevention, Nutrition, outcomes, outcomes measurement, Patient Choice, Patient Compliance, Prevention, Uncategorized

Type 2 Diabetes Reversible With Low Calorie Diet | ConsultantLive

diabetes-guidelines_1We’ve observed and documented this for years in individual patients who our success stories for other patients to emulate. It is nice to have some data that backs up what we’ve known to be true. That being, if you want to reverse your Type II diabetes, chances are you can totally get rid of it BUT it will take a lot of effort and it must be sustained. Pills or Paleo? Only you can decide.

 

Even patients who have had the condition for up to 10 years can reverse it by losing weight and then maintaining the weight loss.

Source: Type 2 Diabetes Reversible With Low Calorie Diet | ConsultantLive

Posted in Access to healthcare, Consumer-Driven Health Care, Direct-Pay Practice Models, Education, Evidence-based Medicine, Medical Practice Models, Patient Choice, Patient Compliance, Patient Safety, Patient-centered Care, primary care, Protocols, Quality, Uncategorized, Wait times to see a doctor

Most of the care you’re receiving isn’t patient-centered. Here’s why.

By Rob Lamberts, MD | Physician  | DPC Journal/CMT Contributor -- http://more-distractible.org/
Rob Lamberts, MD

There is no excuse for the lousy service people get from our system.

Source: Most of the care you’re receiving isn’t patient-centered. Here’s why.