Posted in Access to healthcare, advance-pricing, Consumer-Driven Health Care, Direct-Pay Medicine, Direct-Pay Practice Models, Doctor-Patient Relationship, Economic Issues, Health Insurance, Healthcare financing, Independent Physicians, Medical Costs, Medical Practice Models, out-of-pocket costs, Patient Choice, Patient Compliance, Patient Safety, Patient-centered Care, Policy Issues, primary care, The Quadruple Aim, Third-Party Free Practices, Uncategorized, Wait times to see a doctor

More Patients Turning to ‘Direct Primary Care’ | Medscape

Christine Lehmann, MA

February 11, 2020

Having quick access to a primary care doctor 24/7 is very appealing to Mick Lowderman, 56, who is married with two children, ages 10 and 8. He pays a monthly membership fee to AtlasMD, a direct primary care practice in Wichita, KS.

Primary care is built on the long-term relationship between clinicians and patients. A 10- to 15-minute patient visit doesn’t support that relationship, Sullivan says.

When Kevin Boyd, 64, fell on his stairs in Wichita and broke three ribs, he didn’t go the emergency room. Instead, he called Umbehr, who told him to come to his office. He referred Boyd nearby for an X-ray and dispensed pain medications at his office. The total cost was $70.

In contrast, the first time Boyd fell and broke his ribs, he had Blue Cross Blue Shield and drove himself to the ER, where he saw the ER doctor, a radiologist for an MRI, and got shots for his pain. The total bill was $14,000, and he paid $2,600.

“I don’t put off care the way I used to because of the money I save,” says Boyd, who joined AtlasMD in 2015.
For his monthly membership fee of $75, Boyd gets several benefits, including unlimited 24/7 access to Umbehr by text, email, or phone, extended same- or next-day office visits, and free diagnostic tests and office procedures, such as EKGs, DEXA scans, and body fat analysis. If Boyd gets really sick and needs a house call, or if he needs a phone consult when traveling, those are also included in the fee.
Posted in Access to healthcare, Economic Issues, Education, Government Regulations, Healthcare financing, Influence peddling, Medical Costs, Medical Practice Models, Organizational structure, outcomes, outcomes measurement, Policy Issues, Protocols, The Quadruple Aim, The Triple Aim, Uncategorized

Aim your baloney detector at the BS in health care – STAT


BS, what Princeton philosopher Harry Frankfurt once calleda “lack of connection to a concern with truth — this indifference to how things really are,” has probably been around since the beginning of language.

Health care has an acute BS problem, in part because BS can sometimes fill the bill.

“Suppose you are asked to address an ageless problem in health care: reduce costs while simultaneously raising quality. If you were knowledgeable to begin with or did some research, you would know there is no easy solution. You could respond with a message of failure or a discussion of inevitable trade-offs.

But you could also pick an idea with some internal plausibility and political appeal, surround it with careful but conditional language, and launch a program. It will, you note, take several years before it is successful, but you and your colleagues will argue for the idea in concept, with the details to be worked out later.

At a minimum, unqualified acceptance of such ideas, even (and especially) by apparently qualified people, will waste resources that could have been used to make the best of what we currently have, and will lead to enormous frustration for the audience of politicians and outraged critics of the current system who want answers and want them now.

The incentives to generate BS are not likely to diminish — if anything, rising spending and stagnant health outcomes strengthen them…

…educator, media theorist, and cultural critic Neil Postman said that “helping kids to activate their crap-detectors should take precedence over any other legitimate educational aim …
We have carried Postman’s banner into academia with two reports, one in 2018and another this year, that identify 21 different forms of BS in health care. Here are our top 10:”

https://www.statnews.com/2019/05/03/bs-health-care-baloney-detector/

Posted in Access to healthcare, advance-pricing, Direct-Pay Practice Models, Economic Issues, Education, Employee Benefits, Free-Market, Health Insurance, Healthcare financing, Independent Physicians, Influence peddling, Liberty, Medical Costs, medical inflation, Medical Practice Models, Patient Choice, Policy Issues, Price Tansparency, The Quadruple Aim, The Triple Aim, third-party payments, Uncategorized

Annual Conference | Free Market Medical Association

Forum for Healthcare Freedom is proud to be a Mobile App & WiFi Sponsor for the 2019 Free Market Medical Association annual conference, to be held at the Hyatt Regency in downtown Dallas, TX.

Since 2014, the mission of the FMMA has transformed from Education to Insurrection.  Our mission is to rouse and provoke those suffering because of the broken system and motivate them to fight back.

The 2019 Conference speakers will motivate, energize, influence, and empower attendees to eliminate the option of retreat, reject the status quo, and emancipate themselves from the deteriorating ship.

We have an incredible lineup of general session speakers, including our Keynote Luncheon speaker, the Honorable Ron Paul, M.D.  All attendees will find something of value in one of our eight breakout sessions covering topics such as Incorporating the Free Market into your Benefit Plan, HMOs & the Free Market, Pricing of Specialty Care, Lies Employer’s Believe, Creating Bundled Pricing, and more! The conference will close with our Founder Panel where Dr. Keith Smith and Jay Kempton will present Burning the Ships: Going All In!

Space is limited, so register today!

Source: Annual Conference | Free Market Medical Association

Posted in Access to healthcare, Economic Issues, Education, Employee Benefits, Health Insurance, Healthcare financing, Medical Costs, Medical Practice Models, Organizational structure, outcomes measurement, Patient Choice, Patient Safety, Policy Issues, Price Tansparency, The Quadruple Aim, Uncategorized

University of Lynchburg launches Master of Health Benefits Design – University of Lynchburg

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Tom Scott, Ph.D.

“There’s a need for cohesive education that shows corporations and benefits advisors how to tie together value-based approaches to health care that provide higher quality health care at significantly lower costs,” program director Dr. Tom Scott said. “Health care is expensive and unnecessarily complex. This program not only makes health care understandable, but it shows the way to lower costs and better outcomes.”

https://www.lynchburg.edu/news/2019/02/university-of-lynchburg-launches-master-of-health-benefits-design/

Posted in Access to healthcare, advance-pricing, CPT billing, Direct-Pay Medicine, Direct-Pay Practice Models, Economic Issues, Education, Employee Benefits, Employer-Sponsored Health Plans, Health Insurance, Healthcare financing, Independent Physicians, Medical Costs, medical inflation, Medical Practice Models, Policy Issues, Price Tansparency, The Quadruple Aim, The Triple Aim, Third-Party Free Practices, Uncategorized

The Change We Seek We Must Create

lightbulb.solutionsThe reach and effectiveness of healthcare innovation and change is ultimately staked to how we pay for healthcare in aggregate. Building economic paradigms with more attractive price-value relationships will be the conduit through which change will emerge.

1.Employer education & engagement about the benefits of alternative health plan design based on maximal uncoupling from the BUCAHs.

2. Promoting opportunities for physician independenc apart from the price-concealing contractual third-party payment arrangements, and their co-conspirators, the giant NFP hospital systems.

3. Promoting / facilitating specialty and ancillary service cooperation / agreements which provide them revenue alternatives to the standard price-gouging CPT insurance billing protocols.

Posted in Access to healthcare, Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), British National Health Service, Consumer-Driven Health Care, Deductibles, Direct-Pay Medicine, Direct-Pay Practice Models, Doctor-Patient Relationship, Economic Issues, Education, Electronic Health Records, Employee Benefits, Employer-Sponsored Health Plans, Government Regulations, Health Insurance, Health Savings Accounts (HSA's), Healthcare financing, Individual Market, Medicaid, medical inflation, Medical Practice Models, Medicare, Organizational structure, out-of-pocket costs, outcomes, Patient Choice, Patient Compliance, Patient Safety, Patient-centered Care, Policy Issues, Prevention, primary care, Quality, Reforming Medicaid, Reforming Medicare, The Quadruple Aim, The Triple Aim, Uncategorized

David Goldhill on Cost Drivers and Price Distortions in Healthcare

Minus the introduction and Q&A, the 45 -50 minute presentation is well worth your time. Engaging delivery and compelling case to consider… the cost drivers and distortions come from HOW we access and bill, as opposed to WHAT services are actually exchanged or provided. The key to understanding healthcare costs and pricing is to acknowledge that the answer is contained within our insurance card…and the processes it dictates and the tax/regulatory environment that it operates in. It is kind of like hiding something right out in the open; we look for clues everywhere except for what’s right in front of us. We tend to point fingers at easily identifiable components but fail to see what links them.

Posted in Access to healthcare, Deductibles, Economic Issues, Employee Benefits, Entitlements, Government Regulations, Health Insurance, Health Reimbursement Arrangement (HRA), Health Savings Accounts (HSA's), Healthcare financing, Medical Costs, outcomes, Policy Issues, The Quadruple Aim, The Triple Aim, third-party payments, Uncategorized

Medisave Accounts in Singapore | Health Policy Blog | NCPA.org

If the United States adopted a similar approach to public policy, there would be no deficit problem in this country.

How the system works. In Singapore, people are required to save for health care, retirement income and other needs. They can use their forced saving to purchase a home, pay education expenses, and purchase life insurance and disability insurance. For individuals up to age 50, the required saving rate is 36% of income (nominally divided: 20% from the employee and 16% from the employer). Of this amount, 7 percentage points is for health care and is deposited in a separate Medisave account. Individuals are also automatically enrolled in catastrophic health insurance with a deductible of about US $1,172, although they can opt out. When a Medisave account balance reaches about US $34,100 (an amount equal to a little less than half of the median family income) any excess funds are rolled over into another account and may be used for non-health care purposes.

 

In 1984, Richard Rahn and I wrote an editorial in The Wall Street Journal in which we proposed a savings account for health care. We called it a Medical IRA.

Source: Medisave Accounts in Singapore | Health Policy Blog | NCPA.org

Posted in Access to healthcare, Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), Consumer-Driven Health Care, Direct-Pay Medicine, Direct-Pay Practice Models, Doctor-Patient Relations, Doctor-Patient Relationship, Economic Issues, Employee Benefits, Employer-Sponsored Health Plans, Free-Market, Health Insurance, Independent Physicians, Medical Costs, medical inflation, Medical Practice Models, out-of-pocket costs, outcomes, Patient Choice, Patient-centered Care, Policy Issues, Price Tansparency, primary care, Self-Insured Companies, Self-Insured Plans, Telemedicine Trends, The Quadruple Aim, The Triple Aim, third-party payments, Uncategorized

Three Reasons Why Employers Should Care about Direct Primary Care | Samir Qamar | LinkedIn

Featured Image -- 24171.“Insurance is not necessary for all healthcare.”

2.“Not all healthcare is expensive.”

3.”Employers can use Direct Primary Care to lower healthcare costs.”

Healthcare is the only field where insurance is not only used for rare events, but also common and frequent events. However, “insurance is not necessary for all healthcare”.

To reduce frequency of claims, a large segment of medical care has to be affordable to render insurance unnecessary. Thankfully, “not all healthcare is expensive.”This is where Direct Primary Care makes its grand entrance.

Direct Primary Care takes this majority of healthcare, and caps the cost into an affordable, manageable, flat monthly fee, typically less than $90 per month. As a result, insurance use (and cost) is minimized to rare occurrences.“Employers can use Direct Primary Care to lower healthcare costs.”

Source: Three Reasons Why Employers Should Care about Direct Primary Care | Samir Qamar | LinkedIn