Posted in Access to healthcare, advance-pricing, Economic Issues, Health Insurance, Healthcare financing, Independent Physicians, Medical Costs, Medical Practice Models, out-of-pocket costs, Patient Choice, Price Tansparency, primary care, Uncategorized

Wealth Extracting “Insurance” Bureaucracy vs Real Value-based Care: #DPC

From Dr. Lee Gross, Epiphany Health:

“New patient in the office today had a CT scan ordered by his urologist for presumed symptomatic kidney stones, which was denied by his insurance for 2 months. I ordered the study stat, cash pay. Done 30 minutes later, $220 cost paid by the patient. Stone identified, results given same day. Treatment and care plan initiated. Now that we have a diagnosis, the urologist has the insurance logjam relieved to proceed with a care plan if our conservative therapy is ineffective. Insurance is frequently an obstacle to health care.” #DPC

https://www.facebook.com/groups/DPCdocs/permalink/3473547759342175/

Posted in Access to healthcare, Accountable Care Organizations, Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), CPT billing, Economic Issues, Health Insurance, Healthcare financing, Independent Physicians, Influence peddling, Medical Costs, Medicare, Patient Choice, Patient Safety, Policy Issues, Price Tansparency, Uncategorized

Wax: Making a Killing in American Health Care, a Step-by-Step Guide

Master this how-to guide and you’ll be on your way.

https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2019/12/03/craig-m-wax-do-making-a-killing-in-american-healthcare-a-step-by-step-guide/

Posted in Access to healthcare, Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), American Presidents, Defined Contribution Benefit Plans, Economic Issues, Employee Benefits, Employer-Sponsored Health Plans, Government Regulations, Health Insurance, Health Reimbursement Arrangement (HRA), Healthcare financing, Individual Market, Large group insurance market, Medical Costs, medical inflation, News From Washington, DC & Related Shenanigans, out-of-pocket costs, Policy Issues, Portable Insurance, Price Tansparency, Uncategorized

Trump could revolutionize the private health insurance market

Some believe the Individual Market is too weak to revive, given the hit it took as as result of the ACA.

I am optimistic that this ruling to utilize HRA is this manner will be a “shot in the arm” and revitalize the market again.

This article below highlights the benefits of a defined contribution approach as a means to purchase health insurance. Anything that makes us less dependent on ESI and gives more portability & options, freeing the labor market from job-lock is a good thing. – Forum for Healthcare Freedom

Avek Roy

“Last week, the White House finalized a rule that allows employers to fund health reimbursement arrangements (HRAs) that can be used by workers to buy their own coverage on the individual market. This subtle, technical tweak has the potential to revolutionize the private health insurance market…

The council found an elegant way to give employers the opportunity to voluntarily convert their health benefits from a defined benefit into a defined contribution. For example, an employer could fund an HRA for each worker and their family, which they could then use to shop for a plan that best suits their needs.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/trump-could-revolutionize-the-private-health-insurance-market/2019/06/17/bc8ccce4-9124-11e9-aadb-74e6b2b46f6a_story.html

Posted in Access to healthcare, Economic Issues, Education, Employee Benefits, Health Insurance, Healthcare financing, Medical Costs, Medical Practice Models, Organizational structure, outcomes measurement, Patient Choice, Patient Safety, Policy Issues, Price Tansparency, The Quadruple Aim, Uncategorized

University of Lynchburg launches Master of Health Benefits Design – University of Lynchburg

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Tom Scott, Ph.D.

“There’s a need for cohesive education that shows corporations and benefits advisors how to tie together value-based approaches to health care that provide higher quality health care at significantly lower costs,” program director Dr. Tom Scott said. “Health care is expensive and unnecessarily complex. This program not only makes health care understandable, but it shows the way to lower costs and better outcomes.”

https://www.lynchburg.edu/news/2019/02/university-of-lynchburg-launches-master-of-health-benefits-design/

Posted in Access to healthcare, Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), American Presidents, big government, British National Health Service, Consumer-Driven Health Care, Dependency, Economic Issues, Education, Free Society, Free-Market, Government Regulations, Health Insurance, Healthcare financing, Leadership, Medical Costs, medical inflation, Medicare, outcomes, Policy Issues, Price Tansparency, Reforming Medicare, Uncategorized

4 Questions for Politicians Claiming Single-Payer Will Lower Health Care Costs – Foundation for Economic Education

Unfortunately, outrage buys fewer tongue depressors than one might hope. The top health insurers averaged 4.1 percent profit in 2017 (per Yahoo Finance). That’s taken on half (at most) of spending for-profit insurers handle. Eliminating those profits would save about 2 percent. Since health care gets 4.5 percent more expensive every year, that would in effect roll prices back to last August.


The UK saw costs risewhen it launched the National Health Service (NHS) in 1948. Health Minister Aneurin Bevan bought doctors off (“stuffed their mouths with gold”) to win support for it. Pent-up demand put it over budget immediately. In the first year, it spent 32 times what it had planned for eyeglasses. It had to raise salaries to attract more nurses. Prime Minister Clement Attlee pleaded over the radio with citizens not to overburden the system.

https://fee.org/articles/how-we-know-single-payer-wont-lower-health-care-costs/

Posted in Access to healthcare, advance-pricing, Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), CPT billing, Economic Issues, Health Insurance, Healthcare financing, Individual Underwriting Standards, Insurance subsidies, Medical Costs, medical inflation, Policy Issues, Price Tansparency, Quotes from American Presidents, Self-Insured Companies, Self-Insured Plans, Subsidies, Uncategorized, Uninsured

PassionForSubro » Health Insurance is NOT Health Care

“Just as health insurance is not health care, so too health insurance reform is not health care reform.  Yet, because the ACA got so much press, and many previously uninsured individuals did secure insurance (giving us all the warm and fuzzies), the result was a nationwide misconception that affordable insurance equates with affordable health care. For many, ObamaCare is therefore viewed as a success because millions of uninsured Americans are now insured.

Yet, insurance isn’t a magical money-tree. Like a college student wielding his first credit card, a newly insured America forgets that “someone” has to pay, eventually.  What you buy – with your own money, or with insurance – and how much it costs, still matters.  Insurance just passes the buck – to other insureds, and to you, when the time comes to renew. It blows my mind.  People are involved in car accidents, get out of their vehicle, examine the minor damage, and agree NOT TO REPORT IT TO THEIR INSURANCE, because they DON’T WANT THEIR PREMIUM TO INCREASE! People actually choose to pay for car repairs out of pocket, because they fear insurance premium increases and want to save their insurance for “when they really need it.”  Yet, if we treated auto insurance the way we treat health insurance, we’d be outraged that insurance doesn’t pay for the air in my tires, or the dancing hula girl on my dashboard.”

Source: PassionForSubro » Health Insurance is NOT Health Care

Posted in Access to healthcare, Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), big government, Economic Issues, Free-Market, Government Regulations, Government Spending, Health Insurance, Healthcare financing, Insurance subsidies, Medicaid, Medical Costs, medical inflation, Medicare, out-of-pocket costs, Policy Issues, Subsidies, Tax Policy, third-party payments, Uncategorized

Another Grim Reminder that Obamacare Has Made Healthcare More Expensive | International Liberty

danmitchel
Dan Mitchell

Way back in 2009, some folks on the left shared a chart showing that national expenditures on healthcare compared to life expectancy. This comparison was not favorable to the United States, which e…

Source: Another Grim Reminder that Obamacare Has Made Healthcare More Expensive | International Liberty

Posted in Access to healthcare, British National Health Service, Cartoons, Economic Issues, government incompetence, Government Regulations, Government Spending, Healthcare financing, Organizational structure, Policy Issues, Uncategorized, Wait times to see a doctor

The U.K.’s Government-Run Healthcare System Is Working Wonderfully…for Bureaucrats | International Liberty

Hundreds of NHS managers have amassed million-pound pension pots while presiding over the worst financial crisis in the history of the health service… As patients face crippling delays for treatment, A&E closures and overcrowded wards, bureaucrats have quietly been building up huge taxpayer-funded pensions. They will be handed tax-free six-figure lump sums on retirement, and annual payouts from the age of 60 of at least £55,000 – guaranteed for life.

Nearly 300 directors on NHS trust boards have accrued pension pots valued at £1million or more; At least 36 are sitting on pots in excess of £1.5million – with three topping a staggering £2 million; The NHS pays a staggering 14.3 per cent on top of employees’ salary towards their pension – almost five times the average of 3 per cent paid in the private sector…

Back in 2013, I got very upset when I learned that senior bureaucrats at the IRS awarded themselves big bonuses, notwithstanding the fact that the agency was deeply tarnished by scandal because of …

Source: The U.K.’s Government-Run Healthcare System Is Working Wonderfully…for Bureaucrats | International Liberty