Posted in Access to healthcare, Direct-Pay Medicine, Direct-Pay Practice Models, Economic Issues, Health Insurance, Medical Costs, Medical Practice Models, Patient Choice, Policy Issues, primary care, Unsettled Science

GEORGIA: Will SB50 Make It Past Crossover [Bill] Day in Georgia Legislature? — SB50 passed the Senate by a 49-0 vote on Feb. 21 — SB50 Referred now to House Insurance Committee, must pass by a majority – The Direct Primary Care Journal

georgia

A coalition of six Republican senators sponsor Senate Bill 50 (SB50). Titled the “Direct Primary Care Act,” the legislation specifies that direct primary care agreements (sometimes called medical retainer agreements) do not constitute insurance, thereby freeing doctors and patients from the onerous requirements and regulations under the state insurance code.

A BILL to be entitled an Act to amend Chapter 7 of Title 33 of the Official Code of Georgia Annotated, relating to kinds of insurance, limits of risks, and reinsurance, so as to provide definitions…

Source: GEORGIA: Will SB50 Make It Past Crossover [Bill] Day in Georgia Legislature? — SB50 passed the Senate by a 49-0 vote on Feb. 21 — SB50 Referred now to House Insurance Committee, must pass by a majority – The Direct Primary Care Journal

Posted in Access to healthcare, advance-pricing, Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), Consumer-Driven Health Care, CPT billing, Direct-Pay Medicine, Economic Issues, Employee Benefits, Employer-Sponsored Health Plans, Government Regulations, Health Insurance, Health Savings Accounts (HSA's), Healthcare financing, Individual Mandate, Individual Market, Individual ObamaCare Market, Individual Underwriting Standards, Insurance subsidies, Large group insurance market, Medicaid, medical inflation, Medical Practice Models, Patient Choice, Policy Issues, Portable Insurance, Pre-existing Conditions, Private Exchanges, Quality, Subsidies, Tax Policy, Uncategorized

A Path Towards a Viable Interstate Health Insurance Market | Robert Nelson, MD | Pulse | LinkedIn

Alternatives to our current over-priced and dysfunctional health insurance market are often biased, and thus limited, by our current operational and regulatory structure. These structures are so entrenched in our healthcare psyche that it makes it difficult sometimes to set these aside in our minds while entertaining how another approach might work.

If we view all alternative plans to replace the Affordable Care Act from the vantage point of “what is”, then there is little room for anything other than attempts at further regulating the problems away. If one presupposes that the current regulatory framework remains unchanged, indeed the same framework has served to suppress the very market we wish create, then of course that market will not be created.

The dilemma facing alternative healthcare plans being considered to replace the ACA is particularly evident when it comes to the issue of selling health insurance across state lines. A brief on this subject published by the American Academy of Actuaries in February of 2017 speaks to the the main challenges facing the advent of a viable interstate market for the sale of health insurance.

Source: A Path Towards a Viable Interstate Health Insurance Market | Robert Nelson, MD | Pulse | LinkedIn

Posted in Access to healthcare, Direct-Pay Medicine, Direct-Pay Practice Models, Government Regulations, Health Insurance, Medical Practice Models, Policy Issues

Protect Your Direct Primary Care Practice by Billing in Arrears — Hint Health

download (1)Despite the passage of legislation in ten states clarifying that Direct Primary Care (DPC) is not insurance, the laws governing DPC practices in many states remain ambiguous. In some states, the laws are downright restrictive, which can mean trouble for DPC providers.  

When it came to starting Village Doctor, Dr. Weiss wanted to be sure to stay out from under the microscope of the state insurance commissioner. The two ways he does this are first, by billing in arrears, “after the service and risk have already happened”, and second, by not risk adjusting his fees. What this means for Village Doctor’s patients is that a 25 year-old will pay the same as a 65-year old.

via Protect Your Direct Primary Care Practice by Billing in Arrears — Hint Health.