Posted in Access to healthcare, Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), Economic Issues, government incompetence, Government Regulations, Government Spending, Health Insurance, Healthcare financing, Individual Mandate, Individual Market, Individual ObamaCare Market, Insurance subsidies, Medicaid, Medicaid Expansion, Medical Costs, medical inflation, Policy Issues, Reforming Medicaid, State-Run Insurance Exchanges, Subsidies, Uncategorized

Single-Rural Heath Care: Obamacare Insurers Retreat, Leaving Only One ACA Insurer In Some Areas – Matt Vespa

Monopoly?

Obamacare has been disastrous for health insurers, like UnitedHealth Group, billions have been wasted on state exchanges, which are hanging by a thread, and the law’s enrollment projections (calculated by the CBO three years ago) were off by 24 million for 2016. Now, more Americans are opting to pay the penalty and remain uninsured because it makes more sense for their finances. No wonder why this law is unpopular. Oh, and did I mention that premiums are projected to rise (again) this year. Given the expensive nature of the Obamacare market, some insurers are dropping like flies, giving Americans in some rural areas just one choice when it comes to their health care. Of course, some folks are worried about monopoly dynamics

Source: Single-Rural Heath Care: Obamacare Insurers Retreat, Leaving Only One ACA Insurer In Some Areas – Matt Vespa

Author:

A primary care physician by training, my passion is researching and writing about the importance restoring patient centered care, supporting independent private physicians, promoting free-market solutions and seeking sustainable fiscal policy in healthcare.

2 thoughts on “Single-Rural Heath Care: Obamacare Insurers Retreat, Leaving Only One ACA Insurer In Some Areas – Matt Vespa

  1. Well said, Carl.

    Or as a colleague of mine said, Dr. Sherif Khattab, “Collectively, as a compassionate as well as resourceful society, we will find a path. CMS and its existing obligations necessitates a solution by government and an urgent one at that. But modifying every other private healthcare solution to fix the CMS woes is multiplying the degrees of difficulty.”

    Like

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