Posted in Access to healthcare, Accountable Care Organizations, Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), CPT billing, Economic Issues, Health Insurance, Healthcare financing, Independent Physicians, Influence peddling, Medical Costs, Medicare, Patient Choice, Patient Safety, Policy Issues, Price Tansparency, Uncategorized

Wax: Making a Killing in American Health Care, a Step-by-Step Guide

Master this how-to guide and you’ll be on your way.

https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2019/12/03/craig-m-wax-do-making-a-killing-in-american-healthcare-a-step-by-step-guide/

Posted in Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), CPT billing, Crony Capitalism, Economic Issues, Free-Market, Government Regulations, Health Insurance, Insurance subsidies, Medical Costs, Medicare, Policy Issues, Reforming Medicare, Tax Policy, Uncategorized

Watch “Milton Friedman – Monopoly” on YouTube

The Healthcare industry, or medical-industrial complex, wears the armor of Government-sponsored protectionism; chinked together by pieces of the tax code, The McCarren-Ferguson Act, Certificate of Need laws, Medicare billing regulations, HIPAA, HITECH, and the ACA.

You would be hard pressed to find a more entrenched, impenetrable cartel.

Posted in Access to healthcare, Accountable Care Organizations, Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), American Presidents, Canadian Health System, Direct-Pay Medicine, Economic Issues, Employer-Sponsored Health Plans, Government Regulations, Government Spending, Health Insurance, Healthcare financing, Independent Physicians, Medicaid, Medical Costs, Medical Practice Models, Medicare, News From Washington, out-of-pocket costs, Patient Choice, Policy Issues, Quality, Reforming Medicare, Uncategorized

What You Need To Know About Medicare For All, Part I

A study by Charles Blahousat the Mercatus Center estimates that Medicare for all would cost $32.6 trillion over the next ten years. Other studies have been in the same ballpark and they imply that we would need a 25% payroll tax. And that assumes that doctors and hospitals provide the same amount of care they provide today, even though they would be paid Medicare rates, which are about 40% below what private insurance has been paying. Without those cuts in provider payments, the needed payroll tax would be closer to 30%.

Of course, there would be savings on the other side of the ledger. People would no longer have to pay private insurance premiums and out-of-pocket fees. In fact, for the country as a whole this would largely be a financial wash – a huge substitution of public payment for private payment.

But remember, in today’s world how much you and your employer spend on health care is up to you and your employer. If the cost is too high, you can choose to jettison benefits of marginal value and be more choosey about the doctors and hospitals in your plan’s network. You could also take advantage of medical tourism (traveling to other cities where the costs are lower and the quality is higher) and phone, email and other telemedical innovations described above. The premiums you pay today are voluntary and (absent Obamacare mandates) what you buy with those premiums is a choice you and your employer are free to make.

With Medicare for all, you would have virtually no say in how costs are controlled other than the fact that you would be one of several hundred million potential voters.

Remember also that there is a reason why Obamacare is such a mess. The Democrats in Congress convened special interests around a figurative table – the drug companies, the insurance companies, the doctors, the hospitals, the device manufacturers, big business, big labor, etc. – and gave each a piece of the Obamacare pie in order to buy their political support.

As we show below, every single issue Obamacare had to contend with would be front and center in any plan to replace Obamacare with Medicare for all. So, the Democrats who gave us the last health care reform would be dealing with the same issues and the same special interests the second time around.

It takes a great deal of faith to believe there would be much improvement.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/johngoodman/2018/09/07/what-you-need-to-know-about-medicare-for-all-part-i/

Posted in Access to healthcare, Accountable Care Organizations, Disease Prevention, Economic Issues, Employer-Sponsored Health Plans, Evidence-based Medicine, Health Insurance, Medical Costs, Medical Practice Models, Organizational structure, Patient Safety, Patient-centered Care, Policy Issues, Price Tansparency, Quality, Uncategorized

Not Running a Hospital: The Triple Aimers have missed the mark

Look, there’s nothing wrong with the Triple Aim objectives.  What’s wrong is that its most prominent advocates–some of the most influential health care experts in the country–have focused so heavily on that ideological approach to health care policy that they have absented themselves from the real battles over power, money, customer choice, and cost.  They are losing ground every day.  While they glance elsewhere, the Triple Aim is being turned on its head: The individual experience of care will degrade; the health of populations will decline; and the per capita costs of care for populations will rise.

via Not Running a Hospital: The Triple Aimers have missed the mark.