Posted in Education, emotional intelligence, Pain, Philosophy, Uncategorized

Pascal on Why Living in the Present Is So Difficult (Yet so Important) | Intellectual Takeout

Welcome to another edition of Friday’s Philosophical Foray beyond Healthcare!  In this Friday’s installment, we ponder Blaise Pascal’s explorations regarding the trappings of Time. 

…Pascal says that man has an intimation of perfect happiness deep in his soul but is unable to attain it.  Put another way, man longs for eternity but is stuck in time.  According to Christianity, this time-conditioned earthly existence is only a halfway house on our way to eternal life, when time will dissolve.  We are not naturally at home here on earth, and that is why the present “hurts.”

Although Pascal doesn’t spell out a solution to the dilemma, we can easily draw one.  Our happiness depends on maximizing those experiences which help us escape the “treadmill” of life and find a foretaste of the eternal Now. These include aesthetic experiences, being with family or friends, and the act of simply looking at and contemplating the world in all its richness.

Yet at the same time, the mundane practical aspects of life don’t shrink into nothing—far from it.

They become the arena of service and ethics, part of the drama of life where what we do matters for eternity.  Western civilization was built and sustained in part on these words of Jesus of Nazareth: “Do not be anxious about tomorrow, for tomorrow will be anxious for itself…Seek first his kingdom and his righteousness, and all these things shall be yours as well.”

Pascal, as serious a Christian as they come, would no doubt have agreed that focusing our thoughts away from the self will allow us to banish anxiety and dwell securely in the present.

Source: Pascal on Why Living in the Present Is So Difficult (Yet so Important) | Intellectual Takeout

Posted in Education, Evidence-based Medicine, NIH, outcomes measurement, Quotes from American Presidents, Uncategorized

Check Your Scientism!

qqitfYou might be Scientismist if…

…you source-cite frantically to substantiate your views, even if you haven’t analyzed the data or the methods used or considered the limitations of the findings?

…you automatically believe certain sources and dismiss others without reading the original citations.

…you get your science from Facebook ads

…you believe the use of the phrase “scientific study” imparts devine validation to the conclusions.

…assume peer review is a real thing.

…don’t know the difference between a RCT, case-controlled study, cross-sectional study, cohort study, retrospective or prospective study…and don’t want to because it might call into question validity of your narrative!

…assume strong correlation is same as causation…AND don’t care if you’re wrong as long as it helps make your point!

And the #1 clue that you may be a Scientismist… When your favorite saying is, “the NIH says it, I believe and that settles it!”

Publishing a “study” does not bestow validation and data is mishandled as often as not; which is why much of the medical literature is wrong.

Hyperrational arrogance leads to scientism, which is not the same as good science.

Don’t be a scientismist!

Posted in Access to healthcare, big government, Crony Capitalism, Economic Issues, Free Society, Free-Market, Government Regulations, Government Spending, Health Insurance, Healthcare financing, Liberty, Organizational structure, Patient Choice, Policy Issues, Tax Policy, Uncategorized, Welfare State

Morals Matter in Policy Making

Bastiat.3The notion that there are only two options for healthcare… 1) Central single payer systems vs 2) The current U.S. system or worse…is a false dilemma with false choices.

Efficient economies (socially sustainable marketplaces) utilize multiple financial tools depending on hierarchy of need or desired outcome. And successful self-regulating systems keep as many incentives aligned at the level of the individual end-user as possible; and ensure individual liberty as a first principle.

The desirable balance minimizes tragedy of the commons, maximizes individual responsibility, minimizes bureaucracy & waste, shames/ discourages rent-seeking behavior & cronyism, aligns reward with effort & risk, and always strives to preserve the sovereignty, liberty & choice of the individual as a preeminent principle.

Centralized tax-funded systems often crowd out these other needed tools within the marketplace and are biased heavily towards collective budgetary priorities, as opposed to individual needs/variations.

Posted in Economic Issues, Free Society, Liberty, Policy Issues, Poverty, Uncategorized, Wealth

Watch “6. Skepticism About Distributive Justice | Political Philosophy with Jason Brennan” on YouTube

Any form of “distributive justice” requires repeated violation or usurpation of (potentially) everyone’s liberty or property to rebalance the system; because the introduction of freedom of association & disposition of property will always upset the pattern.

Posted in Economic Issues, Education, Free Society, Income Inequality, Liberty, Policy Issues, Uncategorized, Wealth

Marxism Ignores the Pareto Distribution | Jordan Peterson with Joe Rogan on YouTube

One of the mistaken ideas of Marxism (collectivism philosophy) is that wealth accumulation in the hands of a few is inherent, and specific, to Capitalism. This fails to recognize that in any endeavor -regardless of who plans it or who participates – that success in that endeavor will always be disproportionately held by a few for reasons that have nothing to do with oppression or theft. This may help explain why the egalitarian promises of socialism & Communism never plays out as it is conceived.

Posted in American Exceptionalism, Economic Issues, Education, Entitlements, Free Society, Free-Market, government incompetence, Government Regulations, Income Inequality, Job loss, Leadership, Liberty, Minimum wage, Organizational structure, Policy Issues, Progressivism, Quotes from American Presidents, Uncategorized

Discrimination and Disparities with Thomas Sowell

“The disconnect between the intention and what emerges”

A conversation with Dr. Thomas Sowell about the folly of political initiatives to solve disparate impact. With predictable irony, these same interventions often exacerbate the same problems the were commissioned to fix.