Posted in Disease Prevention, Education, Nutrition, outcomes, outcomes measurement, Patient Safety, Philosophy, Policy Issues, Prevention, Uncategorized

Flawed studies II. Occam’s Razor and How to Reduce Fructose Consumption. | Richard David Feinman

The principle known as Occam’s Razor (Named for William of Ockham (c. 1285–1349) is usually understood as a statement that a simple explanation is preferable to one that is more complicated. The principle has many variations. It might be interpreted as saying that you have to have a sense of priorities.

the idea can be described mathematically by saying that if the outcome, Y, of an experiment can be expressed with a rough sort of equation: Y = A + B + C +… and if A explains Y, then you don’t want to drag in B, C, etc unless you absolutely have to.
The bottom line on this post is that for obesity, diabetes and general health, the predominant effect of diet, the major contribution to the outcome — A in the equation above — is provided by substituting fat (any fat) for carbohydrate (any carbohydrate). That’s what the science says. That will give you the best effect. The B contribution (type of fat, type of carbohydrate) is strictly secondary. The practical consequence: if for some reason, you want to reduce fructose in the diet, the best advice is to reduce carbohydrate across the board.

https://feinmantheother.com/2012/07/27/flawed-studies-ii-occams-razor-and-how-to-reduce-fructose-consumption/

Posted in Disease Prevention, Education, Evidence-based Medicine, outcomes, outcomes measurement, Patient Choice, Patient Safety, Patient-centered Care, Prevention, Protocols, Quality, Uncategorized

Dietary carbohydrate restriction as the first approach in diabetes management: Critical review and evidence base – ScienceDirect

The benefits of carbohydrate restriction in diabetes are immediate and well documented. Concerns about the efficacy and safety are long term and conjectural rather than data driven.

Dietary carbohydrate restriction reliably reduces high blood glucose, does not require weight loss (although is still best for weight loss), and leads to the reduction or elimination of medication. It has never shown side effects comparable with those seen in many drugs.

Here we present 12 points of evidence supporting the use of low-carbohydrate diets as the first approach to treating type 2 diabetes and as the most effective adjunct to pharmacology in type 1. They represent the best-documented, least controversial results. The insistence on long-term randomized controlled trials as the only kind of data that will be accepted is without precedent in science.

The seriousness of diabetes requires that we evaluate all of the evidence that is available. The 12 points are sufficiently compelling that we feel that the burden of proof rests with those who are opposed.”

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0899900714003323

Posted in Disease Prevention, Nutrition, outcomes, outcomes measurement, Prevention, primary care, Uncategorized

Carbs May Be Intrinsically Bad, Regardless of Weight

This week , another nail in the carbohydrate coffin as a small but rigorous study appearing in JCI Insight suggests that a low-carb, high-fat diet improves the metabolic syndromeeven when weight doesn’t change.[1]

 

Source: Carbs May Be Intrinsically Bad, Regardless of Weight