Posted in Disease Prevention, Education, Nutrition, outcomes, outcomes measurement, Patient Safety, Philosophy, Policy Issues, Prevention, Uncategorized

Flawed studies II. Occam’s Razor and How to Reduce Fructose Consumption. | Richard David Feinman

The principle known as Occam’s Razor (Named for William of Ockham (c. 1285–1349) is usually understood as a statement that a simple explanation is preferable to one that is more complicated. The principle has many variations. It might be interpreted as saying that you have to have a sense of priorities.

the idea can be described mathematically by saying that if the outcome, Y, of an experiment can be expressed with a rough sort of equation: Y = A + B + C +… and if A explains Y, then you don’t want to drag in B, C, etc unless you absolutely have to.
The bottom line on this post is that for obesity, diabetes and general health, the predominant effect of diet, the major contribution to the outcome — A in the equation above — is provided by substituting fat (any fat) for carbohydrate (any carbohydrate). That’s what the science says. That will give you the best effect. The B contribution (type of fat, type of carbohydrate) is strictly secondary. The practical consequence: if for some reason, you want to reduce fructose in the diet, the best advice is to reduce carbohydrate across the board.

https://feinmantheother.com/2012/07/27/flawed-studies-ii-occams-razor-and-how-to-reduce-fructose-consumption/

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A primary care physician by training, my passion is researching and writing about the importance restoring patient centered care, supporting independent private physicians, promoting free-market solutions and seeking sustainable fiscal policy in healthcare.