Posted in emotional intelligence, Philosophy, Uncategorized

Lift a Load Worth Lifting

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“It’s said that we’re made in the image of God, us human beings.  It’s hard to say what that means.  But in means, in part, to participate in the process of bringing good into being… And that’s reason for hope. 

There’s something to be said to know that you’re the sort of creature that can look mortality and catastrophe and malevolence straight in the eye, so to speak, and nonetheless do what’s right.  And all there is in that is good!”   

– Jordan Peterson

 

 

Posted in Education, emotional intelligence, Good Stress, Philosophy, Uncategorized

Jordan Peterson Speech at the 2019 PragerU Summit – YouTube

“They say we’re made in the image of God, and it’s hard to say what that means; but it means in part to participate in the process of bringing the GOOD into being.  And we can all do that, and the opposite.

And if we accept our responsibility to ourselves and to others and to our communities and we lift that load up, then we live lives that are meaningful and that stops us from being corrupt.  It provides us with a medication against catastrophe; and also practically improves the world…it’s not just psychological.

You can make things worse and everyone knows that, and no doubt you have in many ways. But you can make things better and they actually GET better and there is a reason for hope. And there is something to said to know that you’re the sort of creature that can look mortality & catastrophe & malevolence straight in the eye, so to speak, and nonetheless stand up and do what’s right…and all there is in that is GOOD.” – Jordan Peterson

Posted in Free Society, Government Regulations, Liberty, Philosophy, Policy Issues, Progressivism, Rule of Law, Science and the Sexes, U.S. Constitution, Uncategorized

Preferred Pronouns or Prison | PragerU

“The State can’t force people to say things they don’t believe.”

Justice Robert Jackson – West Virginia State Board of Education v Barnette (1943)

Source: Preferred Pronouns or Prison | PragerU