Posted in Access to healthcare, Accountable Care Organizations, Disease Prevention, Economic Issues, Employer-Sponsored Health Plans, Evidence-based Medicine, Health Insurance, Medical Costs, Medical Practice Models, Organizational structure, Patient Safety, Patient-centered Care, Policy Issues, Price Tansparency, Quality, Uncategorized

Not Running a Hospital: The Triple Aimers have missed the mark

Look, there’s nothing wrong with the Triple Aim objectives.  What’s wrong is that its most prominent advocates–some of the most influential health care experts in the country–have focused so heavily on that ideological approach to health care policy that they have absented themselves from the real battles over power, money, customer choice, and cost.  They are losing ground every day.  While they glance elsewhere, the Triple Aim is being turned on its head: The individual experience of care will degrade; the health of populations will decline; and the per capita costs of care for populations will rise.

via Not Running a Hospital: The Triple Aimers have missed the mark.

Posted in Access to healthcare, Disease Prevention, Employee Benefits, Employer-Sponsored Health Plans, Evidence-based Medicine, Patient Compliance, Patient-centered Care, Prevention

The Fallacy of Big & Broad Wellness Programs | The Institute for HealthCare Consumerism

matt_cook_omada_health
Matt Cook, Director of Account Management, Omada Health

Perhaps a better line to describe the current state of wellness programs would be “If you build it, and spend a lot of money to incentivize people to use it, they will come – but they probably won’t stay or change their behavior long-term.” Not as catchy, but certainly more accurate. Fortunately, a gradual shift is beginning to take place, in which we’re learning from the failures of big and broad and zeroing in on a more focused and effective approach to wellness.

via The Fallacy of Big & Broad Wellness Programs | The Institute for HealthCare Consumerism.