Posted in Access to healthcare, Crony Capitalism, Economic Issues, Government Regulations, Healthcare financing, Independent Physicians, Medical Costs, Patient Choice, Policy Issues, Price Tansparency, Uncategorized

Institute for Justice: “North Carolina Surgeon Wins First Round in Fight to Eliminate State-enforced Medical Monopoly”

 

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by Justin Wilson

 

“The court correctly rejected the government’s argument that Dr. Singh needed to apply for a CON before bringing this case,” said IJ Attorney Renée Flaherty, who argued the motion. “No one should have to go through an unconstitutional process in order to challenge it. We look forward to showing that North Carolina’s CON law unconstitutionally favors existing businesses at the expense of Dr. Singh and other medical providers.”

In July 2018, IJ and Dr. Singh, a Winston-Salem surgeon, and his business, Forsyth Imaging Center, sued the Department of Health and Human Services, alleging that North Carolina’s CON law is unconstitutional because it bans medical providers from offering services patients need solely to protect existing providers from competition. In order to receive a CON, providers must persuade state officials that new services are “needed” through a cumbersome process that resembles full-blown litigation and allows existing businesses, like established hospitals, to oppose their applications. Even after a CON is granted, existing providers can appeal the decision. Dr. Singh should not have to go through such a burdensome process just to provide affordable services that patients need.

North Carolina Surgeon Wins First Round in Fight to Eliminate State-enforced Medical Monopoly

Posted in Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), CPT billing, Crony Capitalism, Economic Issues, Free-Market, Government Regulations, Health Insurance, Insurance subsidies, Medical Costs, Medicare, Policy Issues, Reforming Medicare, Tax Policy, Uncategorized

Watch “Milton Friedman – Monopoly” on YouTube

The Healthcare industry, or medical-industrial complex, wears the armor of Government-sponsored protectionism; chinked together by pieces of the tax code, The McCarren-Ferguson Act, Certificate of Need laws, Medicare billing regulations, HIPAA, HITECH, and the ACA.

You would be hard pressed to find a more entrenched, impenetrable cartel.

Posted in Access to healthcare, Crony Capitalism, Economic Issues, Government Regulations, Health Insurance, Healthcare financing, Influence peddling, Medical Costs, medical inflation, Medicare, Network Discounts, Organizational structure, outcomes, Patient Choice, Patient Safety, Policy Issues, Price Tansparency, Quality, third-party payments, Uncategorized

Improving Hospital Competition: A Key to Affordable Health Care

Avek Roy

In 2011, James Robinson of the University of California reviewedhospital prices charged to commercial insurers for six common procedures: angioplasty, pacemaker insertion, knee replacement, hip replacement, lumbar fusion, and cervical fusion. He found that, on average, procedures cost 44 percent more in hospital markets with an above-average degree of consolidation.

It is problematic enough that regional hospital monopolies have the power to demand high prices. But on top of this, many hospitals engage in additional anticompetitive practices. Anna Wilde Mathews of the Wall Street Journal obtained secret contracts between insurers and hospitals revealing that these contracts often barred insurers from sending patients to “less-expensive or higher-quality health care providers.” Other hospitals precluded insurers from excluding some of the system’s hospitals from the insurer’s networks. Some contract provisions, including those from New York-Presbyterian Hospital and BJC HealthCare of St. Louis, prevented insurers from disclosing a hospital’s prices to patients.

https://freopp.org/improving-hospital-competition-a-key-to-affordable-medicine-343e9b5c70f

Posted in Access to healthcare, Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), Capers, Crony Capitalism, Economic Issues, Free-Market, Government Regulations, Influence peddling, Medical Costs, Patient Choice, Policy Issues

Removing state-based obstacles to affordable healthcare | TheHill

congress-blogThe negative effect of Certificate of Need laws on competition and the monopoly-like privileges they bestow have attracted the attention of the Justice Department and the FTC. These agencies strongly condemned certificate-of-need laws as recently as 2008, arguing that they ruin the market process while delivering the opposite of the benefits they were intended to promote. 

Above all else, the preponderance of evidence is that certificate-of-need laws do not fulfill any of their intended purposes. According to studies from the Mercatus center at George Mason University, they decrease the availability of medical resources, do not make care more accessible for underserved communities, and increase the costs of care by 13.6 percent per-capita in the states where they exist. If there is any substantial benefit associated with these regulations, such a benefit has yet to present itself. The negatives, on the other hand, are unmistakable.

via Removing state-based obstacles to affordable healthcare | TheHill.

Posted in Access to healthcare, Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), Consumer-Driven Health Care, Crony Capitalism, Doctor-Patient Relations, Economic Issues, Free-Market, Government Regulations, Independent Physicians, Influence peddling, Leadership, Medical Costs, Medical Practice Models, Organizational structure, Patient Choice, Patient Safety, Patient-centered Care, Policy Issues, Price Tansparency, Protocols, Quality, Rule of Law, Uncategorized

Mega-hospitals contribute to high health costs – Reporter.net: Opinion

MUHC-SuperhospitalThe Indiana Policy Review recently compared the bill for a hernia operation at an Indianapolis hospital with the price for the same procedure advertised online by a small entrepreneurial surgery center in Oklahoma. The Indiana hospital received $21,112.81 from the patient and his insurance company. The surgery could have been performed for 85 percent less in Oklahoma. What’s more, the patient would have been guaranteed the price before surgery.

via Mega-hospitals contribute to high health costs – Reporter.net: Opinion.