Posted in Access to healthcare, Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), Direct-Pay Medicine, Doctor-Patient Relationship, Economic Issues, Employee Benefits, Employer-Sponsored Health Plans, Government Regulations, Health Insurance, Health Savings Accounts (HSA's), Healthcare financing, Patient Choice, Policy Issues, primary care, Tax Policy, Uncategorized

Congress and the IRS have stranded patients in SwampCare


Why can’t patients use their HSAs – supposedly their own money – to pay DPC fees? Because the IRS says they can’t. Not only that, if they have a DPC membership, they can’t even make a contribution to their HSA.

Congress was considering a simple bill to fix that – H.R. 365. But on the way to the House Ways and Means Committee, provisions were sneaked in, with very limited time to comment, and the bill number was changed to H.R. 6317. Some things from the Affordable Care Act (ACA) were inserted, along with provisions that independent DPC doctors said would favor huge corporate entities – purveyors of big-box medicine – that want to dominate the market. The government would micromanage what a DPC could or could not offer, based on the AMA’s copyrighted procedure codes, and cap the fee that the DPC could charge – not just the amount that could be paid from an HSA. It would allow only Direct Primary Care. It would not allow Direct Patient Care arrangements with specialists; for example, a direct-care agreement with an endocrinologist to manage diabetes would not qualify. Then the bill was incorporated into H.R. 6199, with some of the objectionable features removed, thanks to patients and doctors who spoke out. We’ll see what emerges from the sausage factory.

Read more at


 

https://mobile.wnd.com/2018/07/congress-and-the-irs-have-stranded-patients-in-swampcare/

Posted in Access to healthcare, Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), Direct-Pay Practice Models, Employee Benefits, Employer Mandate, Employer-Sponsored Health Plans, Essential Benefits under the ACA, Health Insurance, Health Reimbursement Arrangement (HRA), Health Savings Accounts (HSA's), Healthcare financing, Individual Mandate, Policy Issues, Tax Policy, Uncategorized

Healthcare: What to Watch For

“…it is important for employers to be fully aware of what the regulations may impact them to safeguard against inadvertently putting themselves, or their employees, in an untenable situation.

It is important for an employer looking to offer an unconventional or untraditional benefit package to speak with an independent health plan attorney or CPA (not employed by the agency selling the program) regarding potential liability and compliance with federal and state laws regarding employer sponsored health plans.

Can your employee afford to reimburse the IRS for taxes not collected on an inappropriately structured HSA? Can your business afford a fine of $100 per day per employee for every day that the unqualified arrangement was offered? These are just some of the potential liabilities.”

http://ushealthmedia.com/healthcare-what-to-watch-for/

Posted in Access to healthcare, British National Health Service, Cartoons, Economic Issues, government incompetence, Government Regulations, Government Spending, Healthcare financing, Organizational structure, Policy Issues, Uncategorized, Wait times to see a doctor

The U.K.’s Government-Run Healthcare System Is Working Wonderfully…for Bureaucrats | International Liberty

Hundreds of NHS managers have amassed million-pound pension pots while presiding over the worst financial crisis in the history of the health service… As patients face crippling delays for treatment, A&E closures and overcrowded wards, bureaucrats have quietly been building up huge taxpayer-funded pensions. They will be handed tax-free six-figure lump sums on retirement, and annual payouts from the age of 60 of at least £55,000 – guaranteed for life.

Nearly 300 directors on NHS trust boards have accrued pension pots valued at £1million or more; At least 36 are sitting on pots in excess of £1.5million – with three topping a staggering £2 million; The NHS pays a staggering 14.3 per cent on top of employees’ salary towards their pension – almost five times the average of 3 per cent paid in the private sector…

Back in 2013, I got very upset when I learned that senior bureaucrats at the IRS awarded themselves big bonuses, notwithstanding the fact that the agency was deeply tarnished by scandal because of …

Source: The U.K.’s Government-Run Healthcare System Is Working Wonderfully…for Bureaucrats | International Liberty

Posted in Access to healthcare, advance-pricing, Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), Consumer-Driven Health Care, Deductibles, Defined Contribution Benefit Plans, Direct-Pay Medicine, Economic Issues, Employee Benefits, Employer-Sponsored Health Plans, Essential Benefits under the ACA, Federal Exchanges, Free-Market, Government Spending, Health Insurance, Health Reimbursement Arrangement (HRA), Health Savings Accounts (HSA's), Healthcare financing, Independent Physicians, Individual Mandate, Individual Market, Individual ObamaCare Market, Individual Underwriting Standards, Insurance subsidies, Liberty, Medicaid, medical inflation, Patient Choice, Patient-centered Care, Policy Issues, Pre-existing Conditions, Price Tansparency, Private Exchanges, Quality, Reforming Medicaid, Self-Insured Companies, Self-Insured Plans, State-Run Insurance Exchanges, Subsidies, Tax Policy, Uncategorized, Uninsured

All the Problems plaguing ObamaCare are Solved by These 12 Bold Ideas

The Sessions – Cassidy bill:

Source: Summary | Goodman Institute for Public Policy Research

Posted in Access to healthcare, Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), Consumer-Driven Health Care, Economic Issues, Government Spending, Health Insurance, Individual Mandate, Individual ObamaCare Market, Insurance subsidies, Medicaid, Medicaid Expansion, Medical Costs, Patient Choice, Policy Issues, Reforming Medicaid, Subsidies, Tax Policy, Uninsured

Why We Should Replace Obamacare With A Universal Health Tax Credit

forbes_1200x1200One of the most popular items in the tax code is the child tax credit. It’s popular because it recognizes a need that has social importance (raising children) and it addresses the need in a way that is non-intrusive.

All you have to do to get a $1,000 reduction in your income taxes is have a child. The federal government doesn’t tell you what to do with your child or how to spend the money. Wisely, the tax writing committees of the Congress have decided that you know more about how to parent your child than they do.

Why can’t we have something that simple and helpful for health care? We could. If we took all existing health insurance subsidies (including subsidies for employer coverage) and replaced them with a universal tax credit, I believe the amount would be close to $2,500 per adult and $8,000 for a family of four. Since this is roughly what it costs to enroll people in Medicaid, those amounts would buy Medicaid-like insurance. But if people wanted more or better lnsurance (including Health Savings Account plans) they could add their own money or an employer’s money – so long as they used after-tax funds.

The tax credit could copy three features of Obamacare subsidies and still be simple and easy to administer. The credit would be refundable (available to people who don’t owe any taxes), advanceable (so you don’t have to wait until next April 15th to get the money) and transferable (so that signing up for health insurance could be handled by an insurance company or H & R Block).

Here is what we are doing instead:

via Why We Should Replace Obamacare With A Universal Health Tax Credit.

Posted in Economic Issues, Entrepreneurs, Government Regulations, Liberty, News From Washington, Policy Issues, Tax Policy, Uncategorized, Unemployment

Grading the Rubio-Lee Tax Reform Plan – Daniel J. Mitchell – Townhall Finance Conservative Columnists and Financial Commentary – Page full

danmitchel
Dan Mitchell

In a perfect world, we would shrink government to such a small size that there was no need for any sort of broad-based tax (remember, the United States prospered greatly for most of our history when there was no income tax).

In a good world, we could at least replace the corrupt internal revenue code with a  simple and fair flat tax.

In today’s Washington, the best we can hope for is incremental reform.

But some incremental reforms can be very positive, and that’s the best way of describing the “Economic Growth and Family Fairness Tax Reform Plan” unveiled today by Senator Marco Rubio of Florida and Senator Mike Lee of Utah.

The two GOP senators have a column in today’s Wall Street Journal, and you can read a more detailed description of their plan by clicking here.

But here are the relevant details.

Read entire article via Grading the Rubio-Lee Tax Reform Plan – Daniel J. Mitchell – Townhall Finance Conservative Columnists and Financial Commentary – Page full.