Posted in Disease Prevention, Nutrition, outcomes, outcomes measurement, Patient Safety, primary care, Protocols, Quality, Uncategorized, Unsettled Science

RHR: What the Latest Research Says about Probiotics, with Lucy Mailing

We’ve been told for years that we should take probiotics after a course of antibiotics in order to restore healthy gut flora.

And most of us have been telling our clients and patients that as well. I know I have.

But what if that’s not the right advice?

What if probiotics could actually delaythe recovery of the microbiome after antibiotics?

It sounds crazy, I know—but that’s exactly what a recent, well-designed study has found.

https://chriskresser.com/what-the-latest-research-says-about-probiotics-with-lucy-mailing/

Posted in Disease Prevention, Education, Evidence-based Medicine, Medical conditions and illness, Patient Safety, Uncategorized

Goitrogenic Foods and Thyroid Health

In a given week, if a patient is enjoying a couple of sides of steamed broccoli, a few servings of sauerkraut, and several small salads containing spinach and kale, that shouldn’t be a problem. On the other hand, if a patient is downing green smoothies every day, each with two or more cups of raw kale or spinach, then I would be worried about how that’s affecting thyroid function.

Bottom line: encourage your patients to steam or boil goitrogenic foods and not to consume them in excess.

https://kresserinstitute.com/goitrogenic-foods-and-thyroid-health/

Posted in Capers, CDC, Evidence-based Medicine, FDA, Government Regulations, Influence peddling, NIH, Patient Safety, Policy Issues, Unsettled Science

Behind the Veil: Conflicts of Interest and Fraud in Medical Research

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Chris Kresser

If there is a violation, the FDA classifies it in one of two ways: Voluntary action indicated (VAI) means the inspectors have found violations, but the problems aren’t serious enough to require sanction.  Official action indicated (OAI) means that the inspectors have found violations significant enough to warrant official action.

Siefe and his assistants used the Freedom of Information Act to request information from the FDA, and supplemented that data with Google searches of the FDA database. They found 57 clinical trials that were directly linked to an OAI inspection.

The misconduct identified by the FDA in these cases included:

  • Falsification or submission of false information
  • Underreporting of adverse events
  • Failure to follow the investigational plan or other violations of protocol
  • Inadequate record keeping
  • Failure to protect the rights, safety, and welfare of patients
  • Use of experimental compounds in patients not enrolled in trials
  • Failure to supervise clinical investigations properlyThe 57 trials Seife identified were in turn linked to 78 research articles published in the peer-reviewed scientific literature. 96 percent of these articles failed to mention the violations identified by the FDA inspection—despite the fact that in the majority of cases the inspection was completed at least 6 months before the article was published.

via Behind the Veil: Conflicts of Interest and Fraud in Medical Research.