Posted in Disease Prevention, Nutrition, outcomes, outcomes measurement, Prevention, Uncategorized, Unsettled Science

Filter Coffee Tied to Lower Diabetes Risk in Metabolomics Study

Adults who drank two to three cups of filtered coffee a day (the highest quartile of filtered coffee–metabolite score) had a 58% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes within 10 years than those who drank fewer than one cup of filtered coffee a day (lowest quartile) after adjusting for multiple confounders (odds ratio, 0.42; 95% confidence interval, 0.23 – 0.75).

The protective effect of drinking this high amount on the risk of developing type 2 diabetes was not seen with boiled coffee.

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/923238

Posted in Disease Prevention, Education, Nutrition, outcomes, outcomes measurement, Patient Safety, Philosophy, Policy Issues, Prevention, Uncategorized

Flawed studies II. Occam’s Razor and How to Reduce Fructose Consumption. | Richard David Feinman

The principle known as Occam’s Razor (Named for William of Ockham (c. 1285–1349) is usually understood as a statement that a simple explanation is preferable to one that is more complicated. The principle has many variations. It might be interpreted as saying that you have to have a sense of priorities.

the idea can be described mathematically by saying that if the outcome, Y, of an experiment can be expressed with a rough sort of equation: Y = A + B + C +… and if A explains Y, then you don’t want to drag in B, C, etc unless you absolutely have to.
The bottom line on this post is that for obesity, diabetes and general health, the predominant effect of diet, the major contribution to the outcome — A in the equation above — is provided by substituting fat (any fat) for carbohydrate (any carbohydrate). That’s what the science says. That will give you the best effect. The B contribution (type of fat, type of carbohydrate) is strictly secondary. The practical consequence: if for some reason, you want to reduce fructose in the diet, the best advice is to reduce carbohydrate across the board.

https://feinmantheother.com/2012/07/27/flawed-studies-ii-occams-razor-and-how-to-reduce-fructose-consumption/

Posted in American Presidents, Disease Prevention, Education, FDA, government incompetence, Government Regulations, Nutrition, outcomes, Patient Choice, Patient Safety, Policy Issues, Prevention, Quality, Uncategorized

Watch “How the Government Made You Fat” on YouTube

Or AKA…

Stay in Your Lane:  Why the government should not parent the citizenry.

Posted in Disease Prevention, Nutrition, outcomes, outcomes measurement, Prevention, primary care, Uncategorized

Carbs May Be Intrinsically Bad, Regardless of Weight

This week , another nail in the carbohydrate coffin as a small but rigorous study appearing in JCI Insight suggests that a low-carb, high-fat diet improves the metabolic syndromeeven when weight doesn’t change.[1]

 

Source: Carbs May Be Intrinsically Bad, Regardless of Weight

Posted in Disease Prevention, Education, Nutrition, Prevention, Uncategorized, Unsettled Science

Drinking Tea: Are the Health Benefits Real?

Current evidence points to the many potential benefits of tea drinking—some of which appear to be associated with its antioxidative properties, whereas others may simply coincide with a healthy lifestyle. Nevertheless, the uneven quality of the data and the diverse types of studies make it difficult to draw firm conclusions. Which teas have the strongest health benefits (or risks) and why remains unknown. Researchers still need to address many facets surrounding tea and health, including the ideal brewing methods; the addition of substances; the frequency, amount, and duration of consumption; and whether a tea leaf’s health potential declines as it ages. Furthermore, a significant proportion of studies were conducted in Asian populations, where tea drinking is widespread. Future research should include more diverse populations of tea drinkers.

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/907456_5

Posted in Disease Prevention, Education, Evidence-based Medicine, Nutrition, outcomes, Prevention, Uncategorized

10 Recommendations on How to Prevent Cancer

“A new report that has reviewed all the data from the last 30 years on diet, weight, physical activity, and cancer has confirmed the link between cancer and lifestyle and provides evidence-based recommendations on how to reduce cancer risk.

The report distills the entirety of the literature down to 10 cancer prevention recommendations, said coauthor Nigel Brockton, PhD, director of research at the AICR.

“Each of these recommendations is based on factors for which there is strong evidence for increasing or decreasing risk of cancer, and they form a blueprint for healthy living to reduce the risk of cancer,” Dr Brockton told Medscape Medical News.”

https://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/897664

Posted in Disease Prevention, Nutrition, outcomes, outcomes measurement, Patient Safety, primary care, Protocols, Quality, Uncategorized, Unsettled Science

RHR: What the Latest Research Says about Probiotics, with Lucy Mailing

We’ve been told for years that we should take probiotics after a course of antibiotics in order to restore healthy gut flora.

And most of us have been telling our clients and patients that as well. I know I have.

But what if that’s not the right advice?

What if probiotics could actually delaythe recovery of the microbiome after antibiotics?

It sounds crazy, I know—but that’s exactly what a recent, well-designed study has found.

https://chriskresser.com/what-the-latest-research-says-about-probiotics-with-lucy-mailing/