Posted in Access to healthcare, Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), American Presidents, Defined Contribution Benefit Plans, Economic Issues, Employee Benefits, Employer Mandate, Employer-Sponsored Health Plans, Government Regulations, Health Insurance, Health Reimbursement Arrangement (HRA), Healthcare financing, Individual Market, Individual ObamaCare Market, Individual Underwriting Standards, Medical Costs, News From Washington, Patient Choice, Policy Issues, Portable Insurance, Pre-existing Conditions, The Triple Aim, Uncategorized

Donald Trump Takes A Big Step Toward Personal And Portable Health Insurance

READ THIS ARTICLE below if you want to understand the degree to which this ruling is an important step for healthcare reform.

But as John C. Goodman points out, administrative ruling can only go so far without being codified by legislative action.

Some believe the Individual Market is too weak to revive, given the hit it took as as result of the ACA.

I am optimistic that this ruling to utilize HRA is this manner will be a “shot in the arm” and revitalize the market again.

This hopefully highlights the benefits, and spurs popularity, of a defined contribution approach as a means to purchase health insurance.

Anything that makes us less dependent on ESI and gives more portability & options, freeing the labor market from job-lock is a good thing. -Forum for Healthcare Freedom

John C. Goodman

https://www.forbes.com/sites/johngoodman/2019/06/18/donald-trump-takes-a-big-step-toward-personal-and-portable-health-insurance/

Posted in Access to healthcare, Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), Community Underwriting, Economic Issues, Employee Benefits, Essential Benefits under the ACA, Government Regulations, Health Insurance, Healthcare financing, Individual Market, Individual ObamaCare Market, Individual Underwriting Standards, Insurance subsidies, Large group insurance market, Medicaid, Medicaid Expansion, Medical Costs, Policy Issues, Uncategorized

Analysis of the ACA: A Public Policy “Devil in the Details”

thinkadvisor-footer-logo

Individual Health Shrinkage Drives Up Uninsured Rate: CBO Data

~Enrollment in every other major type of coverage grew or held steady~

The subtitle in the article above is correct: Enrollment in every other major type of coverage grew or held steady.

But this should not surprise anyone.

“Why the other major types of coverage increased, is the more important question. And examining this also reveals that the real, or net, uninsured rate probably went up much less than 5%.

The CBO data, based on their own definition of “insurance”, was destined to over-state the number of uninsured based on these data…

“CBO includes only major medical insurance that meets ACA minimum essential coverage standards in that definition. It excludes people who belong to health care cost sharing ministries. It also excludes people who are using products such as short-term health insurance as alternatives to major medical coverage.”

Nor does the number of “uninsured” mean that those folks went without care, especially those who might have cash-friendly Primary Care providers, or a Direct Primary Care physician.

And, as premiums continue to rise in the individual market we will see a shift from Unsubsidized plans to subsidized plan; and just as the data indicates we’ve witnessed a 300,000 shift in that direction.

Let’s examine some recent history as a perspective.

The first two enrollment periods after implementation of ACA in late 2013 and 2014, which also corresponded to economic recovery (no cause and effect) showed that the largest portion of newly insured (following the nadir of the uninsured rate) came from the Employer group market as hiring increased; and the second largest portion came from Medicaid and the smallest percentage from the individual market in form of ACA exchanges.

When you measure the effects directly attributable to ACA, the largest percent gains in insured rate have come from new Medicaid, followed by subsidized ACA plans.  This is a crowd-out phenomenon at work, catalyzed by subsidized coverage (Medicaid expansion) on one end and rising premium prices in the Individual market on the other.

This is horrible public policy as it doesn’t promote insurance to be more affordable or efficient, it simply shifts the burden to the public sector while making premiums more expensive.  And those premium increases are a direct result of regulations placed on the Individual Market: Community Rating, guaranteed issue and compression of the age ratios to 3:1, in an attempt to force it to “behave” more like the group market.

So does it really make sense to purposefully, by design, cause the price of insurance to rise and then turn around and subsidize the same product to make it “affordable”?  I guess we know how they justify the name… Affordable Care Act… but there certainly isn’t any buyer protection from soaring prices!

All of which goes to show, that the net effect of the ACA has been to make the individual market UNAFFORDABLE which effectively shunts the demand into gov’t sponsored and/or subsidized coverage!

This is NOT a sound healthcare policy.  But it is a very effective form of legal plunder accomplished by using the law to benefit a few special interests at the expense of the many.

Posted in Access to healthcare, Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), American Presidents, Economic Issues, Employee Benefits, Essential Benefits under the ACA, Government Regulations, Health Insurance, Healthcare financing, Individual Market, Individual ObamaCare Market, Individual Underwriting Standards, Insurance subsidies, Medical Costs, News From Washington, Patient Choice, Policy Issues, Pre-existing Conditions, Uncategorized, Uninsured

Obamacare is now optional

Michael F. Cannon
Michael F. Cannon

“Wednesday’s rule reinstates and even expands the consumer protections Obama curtailed. It allows short-term plans to last 12 months, and allows insurers to offer them with renewal guarantees.

You read that right. Democrats curtailed consumer protections; Republicans are expanding them.

The policy change also promises more secure coverage for the sick. It frees consumers to avoid Obamacare’s price controls, which are eroding coverage for the sick. Instead, consumers can purchase consecutive short-term plans, tied together with renewal guarantees that protect them from medical underwriting when they fall ill.

Renewal guarantees can even protect some 200 million consumers with employer-based coverage, or no health insurance, from medical underwriting — for just one-tenth the cost of Obamacare plans.

When Congress passed Obamacare, insurers had just begun selling renewal guarantees as a standalone product. These policies gave purchasers the right to enroll in a health insurance plan whenever they wanted, at healthy-person premiums, no matter how sick they got in the meantime, and cost roughly 90 percent less than the average Obamacare premium. Twenty-five states approved this marvelous innovation for sale before Obama unilaterally banned it. Wednesday’s rule makes this and further innovations possible again.”

https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/obamacare-is-now-optional

Posted in Access to healthcare, Accountable Care Organizations, Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), Consumer-Driven Health Care, Crony Capitalism, Doctor shortage, Economic Issues, Employer-Sponsored Health Plans, Evidence-based Medicine, Free-Market, Government Regulations, Health Insurance, Healthcare financing, Independent Physicians, Individual Market, Individual Underwriting Standards, Influence peddling, Large group insurance market, Medical Costs, Medical Practice Models, Medicare, Organizational structure, Patient Choice, Patient Safety, Policy Issues, Price Tansparency, Protocols, State Medical Boards, third-party payments, Uncategorized

Save Us From The Health Care Reformers: They’re The Problem, Not The Solution

257e412251dd752f730fd7cb60c52ee2
John C. Goodman

Dr. Goodman’s article is a fantastic foray into the dark history organized medicine, culminating with a brutally honest assessment of the cartel that resulted. He gives a great preview of the good stuff in Greg Scandlen’s new book, Myth Busters: Why Health Reform Always Goes Awry, summarizing the oft-repeated myths we hear about healthcare economics thrown around like dogma.

Source: Save Us From The Health Care Reformers: They’re The Problem, Not The Solution

Posted in Access to healthcare, advance-pricing, Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), CPT billing, Economic Issues, Health Insurance, Healthcare financing, Individual Underwriting Standards, Insurance subsidies, Medical Costs, medical inflation, Policy Issues, Price Tansparency, Quotes from American Presidents, Self-Insured Companies, Self-Insured Plans, Subsidies, Uncategorized, Uninsured

PassionForSubro » Health Insurance is NOT Health Care

“Just as health insurance is not health care, so too health insurance reform is not health care reform.  Yet, because the ACA got so much press, and many previously uninsured individuals did secure insurance (giving us all the warm and fuzzies), the result was a nationwide misconception that affordable insurance equates with affordable health care. For many, ObamaCare is therefore viewed as a success because millions of uninsured Americans are now insured.

Yet, insurance isn’t a magical money-tree. Like a college student wielding his first credit card, a newly insured America forgets that “someone” has to pay, eventually.  What you buy – with your own money, or with insurance – and how much it costs, still matters.  Insurance just passes the buck – to other insureds, and to you, when the time comes to renew. It blows my mind.  People are involved in car accidents, get out of their vehicle, examine the minor damage, and agree NOT TO REPORT IT TO THEIR INSURANCE, because they DON’T WANT THEIR PREMIUM TO INCREASE! People actually choose to pay for car repairs out of pocket, because they fear insurance premium increases and want to save their insurance for “when they really need it.”  Yet, if we treated auto insurance the way we treat health insurance, we’d be outraged that insurance doesn’t pay for the air in my tires, or the dancing hula girl on my dashboard.”

Source: PassionForSubro » Health Insurance is NOT Health Care

Posted in Access to healthcare, advance-pricing, Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), Consumer-Driven Health Care, CPT billing, Direct-Pay Medicine, Economic Issues, Employee Benefits, Employer-Sponsored Health Plans, Government Regulations, Health Insurance, Health Savings Accounts (HSA's), Healthcare financing, Individual Mandate, Individual Market, Individual ObamaCare Market, Individual Underwriting Standards, Insurance subsidies, Large group insurance market, Medicaid, medical inflation, Medical Practice Models, Patient Choice, Policy Issues, Portable Insurance, Pre-existing Conditions, Private Exchanges, Quality, Subsidies, Tax Policy, Uncategorized

A Path Towards a Viable Interstate Health Insurance Market | Robert Nelson, MD | Pulse | LinkedIn

Alternatives to our current over-priced and dysfunctional health insurance market are often biased, and thus limited, by our current operational and regulatory structure. These structures are so entrenched in our healthcare psyche that it makes it difficult sometimes to set these aside in our minds while entertaining how another approach might work.

If we view all alternative plans to replace the Affordable Care Act from the vantage point of “what is”, then there is little room for anything other than attempts at further regulating the problems away. If one presupposes that the current regulatory framework remains unchanged, indeed the same framework has served to suppress the very market we wish create, then of course that market will not be created.

The dilemma facing alternative healthcare plans being considered to replace the ACA is particularly evident when it comes to the issue of selling health insurance across state lines. A brief on this subject published by the American Academy of Actuaries in February of 2017 speaks to the the main challenges facing the advent of a viable interstate market for the sale of health insurance.

Source: A Path Towards a Viable Interstate Health Insurance Market | Robert Nelson, MD | Pulse | LinkedIn

Posted in Access to healthcare, Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), Deductibles, Employee Benefits, Employer Mandate, Employer-Sponsored Health Plans, Essential Benefits under the ACA, Health Insurance, Health Savings Accounts (HSA's), Healthcare financing, Individual Mandate, Individual Market, Individual ObamaCare Market, Individual Underwriting Standards, Large group insurance market, Medicaid, Medical Costs, Medical Practice Models, Medicare, Organizational structure, Policy Issues, Portable Insurance, Pre-existing Conditions, primary care, Reforming Medicaid, Self-Insured Plans, Small group market, Tax Policy, Uncategorized

Obamacare Replacement Act – Senate Bill 222 by Senator Rand Paul – KY

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., speaks during an event at the University of Chicago's Ida Noyes Hall in Chicago on Tuesday, April 22, 2014. (AP Photo/Andrew A. Nelles) ORG XMIT: ILAN114Lots to like and consider here.  We need more details about how tax equalization in the group market vs the individual market will be handled.  The expansion of uses and benefits of HSAs is robust and will go along way to establishing more ways to self-insure and less reliance on networks and government programs; both are a good thing.  The flexible, market-friendly Interstate Market for Health Insurance Cooperative Governing of Individual Health Insurance Coverage will be a welcome change.  Again, devil is always in the details.  Stay tuned for more details and insightful analysis here on the Sovereign Patient; we will post them as available. 

Some highlights:

Effective as of the date of enactment of this bill, the following provisions of Obamacare are repealed:

  • Individual and employer mandates, community rating restrictions, rate review, essential health benefits requirement, medical loss ratio, and other insurance mandates.

Protecting Individuals with Pre-Existing Conditions:

  • Provides a two-year open-enrollment period under which individuals with pre-existing conditions can obtain coverage.
  • Restores HIPAA pre-existing conditions protections. Prior to Obamacare, HIPAA guaranteed those within the group market could obtain continuous health coverage regardless of preexisting conditions.

Equalize the Tax Treatment of Health Insurance:

  • Individuals who receive health insurance through an employer are able to exclude the premium amount from their taxable income. However, this subsidy is unavailable for those that do not receive their insurance through an employer but instead shop for insurance on the individual market.
  • Equalizes the tax treatment of the purchase of health insurance for individuals and employers. By providing a universal deduction on both income and payroll taxes regardless of how an individual obtains their health insurance, Americans will be empowered to purchase insurance independent of employment. Furthermore, this provision does not interfere with employer-provided coverage for Americans who prefer those plans.

Expansion of Health Savings Accounts:

  • Tax Credit for HSA Contributions
    • Provides individuals the option of a tax credit of up to $5,000 per taxpayer for contributions to an HSA. If an individual chooses not to accept the tax credit or contributes in excess of $5,000, those contributions are still tax-preferred.
  • Maximum Contribution Limit to HSA. Removes the maximum allowable annual contribution, so that individuals may make unlimited contributions to an HSA.
  • Eliminates the requirement that a participant in an HSA be enrolled in a high deductible health care plan. This section removes the HSA plan type requirement to allow individuals with all types of insurance to establish and use an HSA.
  • This would also enable individuals who are eligible for Medicare, VA benefits, TRICARE, IHS, and members of health care sharing ministries to be eligible to establish an HSA.
  • Allowance of Distributions for Prescription and OTC Drugs o Allows prescription and OTC drug costs to be treated as allowable expenses of HSAs.
  • Purchase of Health Insurance from HSA Account o Currently, HSA funds may not be used to purchase insurance or cover the cost of premiums. Allowing the use of HSA funds for insurance premiums will help make health coverage more affordable for American families.
  • Medical Expenses Incurred Prior to Account Establishment o Allows qualified expenses incurred prior to HSA establishment to be reimbursed from an HSA as long as the account is established prior to tax filing.
  • Administrative Error Correction Before Due Date of Return o Amends current law by allowing for administrative or clerical error corrections on filings.
  • Allowing HSA Rollover to Child or Parent of Account Holder o Allows an account holder’s HSA to rollover to a child, parent, or grandparent, in addition to a spouse.
  • Equivalent Bankruptcy Protections for HSAs as Retirement Funds o Most tax-exempt retirement accounts are also fully exempt from bankruptcy by federal law. While some states have passed laws that exempt HSA funds from being seized in bankruptcy, there is no federal protection for HSA funds in bankruptcy.
  • Certain Exercise Equipment and Physical Fitness Programs to be Treated as Medical Care. Expands allowable HSA expenses to include equipment for physical exercise or health coaching, including weight loss programs.
  • Nutritional and Dietary Supplements to be Treated as Medical Care o Amends the definition of “medical care” to include dietary and nutritional supplements for the purposes of HSA expenditures.
  • Certain Providers Fees to be Treated as Medical Care o Allows HSA funds to be used for periodic fees paid to medical practitioners for access to medical care.
  • Capitated Primary Care Payments o HSAs can be used for pre-paid physician fees, which includes payments associated with “concierge” or “direct practice” medicine.
  • Provisions Relating to Medicare o Allows Medicare enrollees to contribute their own money to the Medicare Medical Savings Accounts (MSAs).

Interstate Market for Health Insurance Cooperative Governing of Individual Health Insurance Coverage:

  • Increases access to individual health coverage by allowing insurers licensed to sell policies in one state to offer them to residents of any other state.
  • Exempts issuers from secondary state laws that would prohibit or regulate their operation in the secondary state. However, states may impose requirements such as consumer protections and applicable taxes, among others.
  • Prohibits an issuer from offering, selling, or issuing individual health insurance coverage in a secondary state: If the state insurance commissioner does not use a risk-based capital formula for the determination of capital and surplus requirements for all issuers. Unless both the secondary and primary states have legislation or regulations in place establishing an independent review process for individuals who have individual health insurance coverage; or The issuer provides an acceptable mechanism under which the review is conducted by an independent medical reviewer or panel.
  • Gives sole jurisdiction to the primary state to enforce the primary state’s covered laws in the primary state and any secondary state.
  • Allows the secondary state to notify the primary state if the coverage offered in the secondary state fails to comply with the covered laws in the primary state.

Source: Microsoft Word – Obamacare Replacement Act SBS.docx

Posted in Access to healthcare, advance-pricing, Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), Consumer-Driven Health Care, Deductibles, Defined Contribution Benefit Plans, Direct-Pay Medicine, Economic Issues, Employee Benefits, Employer-Sponsored Health Plans, Essential Benefits under the ACA, Federal Exchanges, Free-Market, Government Spending, Health Insurance, Health Reimbursement Arrangement (HRA), Health Savings Accounts (HSA's), Healthcare financing, Independent Physicians, Individual Mandate, Individual Market, Individual ObamaCare Market, Individual Underwriting Standards, Insurance subsidies, Liberty, Medicaid, medical inflation, Patient Choice, Patient-centered Care, Policy Issues, Pre-existing Conditions, Price Tansparency, Private Exchanges, Quality, Reforming Medicaid, Self-Insured Companies, Self-Insured Plans, State-Run Insurance Exchanges, Subsidies, Tax Policy, Uncategorized, Uninsured

All the Problems plaguing ObamaCare are Solved by These 12 Bold Ideas

The Sessions – Cassidy bill:

Source: Summary | Goodman Institute for Public Policy Research